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Oxidative stress induced changes in plasma protein can be a predictor of imminent severe dengue infection.
Acta Trop. 2008 Jun; 106(3):156-61.AT

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Oxidative stress in dengue viral infection has been suggested and severity of it was found to be associated with progress of illness. Hence assessing oxidative stress mediated changes in plasma proteins can be an early biomarker for prediction of severe dengue infection.

DESIGN AND METHODS

Thirty two dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 21 dengue shock syndrome (DSS), 27 dengue fever (DF) and 63 age and sex matched controls, were included in this study. Blood samples were collected on the 3rd day of fever. Protein carbonylation (PCOs) and protein-bound sulphydryl (PBSH) group levels were determined by spectrophotometric method and analyzed as predictor of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

RESULTS

About 80-84% of cases presented with no signs of DHF/DSS at the time of sampling. Dengue infected individuals had significantly elevated PCOs and low PBSH group levels than the controls. Using one-way ANOVA we found a significant difference with high PCOs and low PBSH group levels between DHF and DSS when compared with DF (P<0.001). However, no difference was observed in PBSH group levels between DHF and DSS. A significant difference in PCOs to PBSH ratio was observed among DF, DHF and DSS (P<0.001). Linear regression analysis revealed that duration of hospitalization is dependent on PCOs and PBSH group levels. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis indicated that 5.22nmol/mg protein PCOs; 1.08 PCOs to PBSH group levels ratio were optimal cutoff value for predicting DHF with sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 74.1%; 96.9% and 81.5%, respectively. For DSS prediction, 6.13 nmol/mg protein PCOs; 1.16 PCOs to PBSH group levels ratio were found as effective cutoff with sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 71.9%; 95.2% and 56.2%, respectively.

CONCLUSION

Oxidative stress has been observed to develop since early days of onset of dengue infection. Plasma PCOs, PCOs to PBSH group ratio were found to very well predict DHF/DSS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, Vector Control Research Centre, Pondicherry, India. soundy27@yahoo.co.inNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18420173

Citation

Soundravally, R, et al. "Oxidative Stress Induced Changes in Plasma Protein Can Be a Predictor of Imminent Severe Dengue Infection." Acta Tropica, vol. 106, no. 3, 2008, pp. 156-61.
Soundravally R, Sankar P, Hoti SL, et al. Oxidative stress induced changes in plasma protein can be a predictor of imminent severe dengue infection. Acta Trop. 2008;106(3):156-61.
Soundravally, R., Sankar, P., Hoti, S. L., Selvaraj, N., Bobby, Z., & Sridhar, M. G. (2008). Oxidative stress induced changes in plasma protein can be a predictor of imminent severe dengue infection. Acta Tropica, 106(3), 156-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2008.03.001
Soundravally R, et al. Oxidative Stress Induced Changes in Plasma Protein Can Be a Predictor of Imminent Severe Dengue Infection. Acta Trop. 2008;106(3):156-61. PubMed PMID: 18420173.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oxidative stress induced changes in plasma protein can be a predictor of imminent severe dengue infection. AU - Soundravally,R, AU - Sankar,P, AU - Hoti,S L, AU - Selvaraj,N, AU - Bobby,Z, AU - Sridhar,M G, Y1 - 2008/03/13/ PY - 2007/11/18/received PY - 2008/03/03/revised PY - 2008/03/04/accepted PY - 2008/4/19/pubmed PY - 2008/8/13/medline PY - 2008/4/19/entrez SP - 156 EP - 61 JF - Acta tropica JO - Acta Trop VL - 106 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Oxidative stress in dengue viral infection has been suggested and severity of it was found to be associated with progress of illness. Hence assessing oxidative stress mediated changes in plasma proteins can be an early biomarker for prediction of severe dengue infection. DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty two dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 21 dengue shock syndrome (DSS), 27 dengue fever (DF) and 63 age and sex matched controls, were included in this study. Blood samples were collected on the 3rd day of fever. Protein carbonylation (PCOs) and protein-bound sulphydryl (PBSH) group levels were determined by spectrophotometric method and analyzed as predictor of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. RESULTS: About 80-84% of cases presented with no signs of DHF/DSS at the time of sampling. Dengue infected individuals had significantly elevated PCOs and low PBSH group levels than the controls. Using one-way ANOVA we found a significant difference with high PCOs and low PBSH group levels between DHF and DSS when compared with DF (P<0.001). However, no difference was observed in PBSH group levels between DHF and DSS. A significant difference in PCOs to PBSH ratio was observed among DF, DHF and DSS (P<0.001). Linear regression analysis revealed that duration of hospitalization is dependent on PCOs and PBSH group levels. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis indicated that 5.22nmol/mg protein PCOs; 1.08 PCOs to PBSH group levels ratio were optimal cutoff value for predicting DHF with sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 74.1%; 96.9% and 81.5%, respectively. For DSS prediction, 6.13 nmol/mg protein PCOs; 1.16 PCOs to PBSH group levels ratio were found as effective cutoff with sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 71.9%; 95.2% and 56.2%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Oxidative stress has been observed to develop since early days of onset of dengue infection. Plasma PCOs, PCOs to PBSH group ratio were found to very well predict DHF/DSS. SN - 0001-706X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18420173/Oxidative_stress_induced_changes_in_plasma_protein_can_be_a_predictor_of_imminent_severe_dengue_infection_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001-706X(08)00070-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -