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Chief nursing officer retention and turnover: a crisis brewing? Results of a national survey.
J Healthc Manag. 2008 Mar-Apr; 53(2):89-105; discussion 105-6.JH

Abstract

Anecdotal evidence suggests growing concerns about chief nursing officer (CNO) dissatisfaction, intent to leave, and turnover. However, little evidence documents the magnitude of the problem or whether CNO turnover requires direct action. This article reports the results from the first phase of a three-phase study examining CNO turnover and retention in U.S. hospitals. CNOs were invited to complete an online survey to gather data about their experiences with turnover and to identify CNO retention issues. Our sample includes responses from 622 CNOs employed in hospitals and healthcare systems across the United States. Approximately 38 percent of the respondents reported having left a CNO position-13 percent within two years before the survey and 25 percent within five years before the survey. Of these, approximately one-quarter had been asked to resign, had been terminated, or had lost their jobs involuntarily. When asked about the context of their departure, a high percentage reported leaving their position to pursue another CNO position (50 percent) or for career advancement (30 percent); approximately 26 percent reported leaving because of conflicts with the chief executive officer. Of great concern is the finding that approximately 62 percent of respondents anticipate making a job change in less than five years, slightly more than one-quarter for retirement. Respondents clearly indicated that CNO turnover is a problem that requires attention. The knowledge gained from this study can be used by healthcare leaders to develop strategies and policies aimed at recruiting and retaining CNOs and easing the transition for CNOs and others in the organization when CNO turnover does

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. cabjones@email.unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18421994

Citation

Jones, Cheryl B., et al. "Chief Nursing Officer Retention and Turnover: a Crisis Brewing? Results of a National Survey." Journal of Healthcare Management / American College of Healthcare Executives, vol. 53, no. 2, 2008, pp. 89-105; discussion 105-6.
Jones CB, Havens DS, Thompson PA. Chief nursing officer retention and turnover: a crisis brewing? Results of a national survey. J Healthc Manag. 2008;53(2):89-105; discussion 105-6.
Jones, C. B., Havens, D. S., & Thompson, P. A. (2008). Chief nursing officer retention and turnover: a crisis brewing? Results of a national survey. Journal of Healthcare Management / American College of Healthcare Executives, 53(2), 89-105; discussion 105-6.
Jones CB, Havens DS, Thompson PA. Chief Nursing Officer Retention and Turnover: a Crisis Brewing? Results of a National Survey. J Healthc Manag. 2008 Mar-Apr;53(2):89-105; discussion 105-6. PubMed PMID: 18421994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chief nursing officer retention and turnover: a crisis brewing? Results of a national survey. AU - Jones,Cheryl B, AU - Havens,Donna S, AU - Thompson,Pamela A, PY - 2008/4/22/pubmed PY - 2008/7/30/medline PY - 2008/4/22/entrez SP - 89-105; discussion 105-6 JF - Journal of healthcare management / American College of Healthcare Executives JO - J Healthc Manag VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - Anecdotal evidence suggests growing concerns about chief nursing officer (CNO) dissatisfaction, intent to leave, and turnover. However, little evidence documents the magnitude of the problem or whether CNO turnover requires direct action. This article reports the results from the first phase of a three-phase study examining CNO turnover and retention in U.S. hospitals. CNOs were invited to complete an online survey to gather data about their experiences with turnover and to identify CNO retention issues. Our sample includes responses from 622 CNOs employed in hospitals and healthcare systems across the United States. Approximately 38 percent of the respondents reported having left a CNO position-13 percent within two years before the survey and 25 percent within five years before the survey. Of these, approximately one-quarter had been asked to resign, had been terminated, or had lost their jobs involuntarily. When asked about the context of their departure, a high percentage reported leaving their position to pursue another CNO position (50 percent) or for career advancement (30 percent); approximately 26 percent reported leaving because of conflicts with the chief executive officer. Of great concern is the finding that approximately 62 percent of respondents anticipate making a job change in less than five years, slightly more than one-quarter for retirement. Respondents clearly indicated that CNO turnover is a problem that requires attention. The knowledge gained from this study can be used by healthcare leaders to develop strategies and policies aimed at recruiting and retaining CNOs and easing the transition for CNOs and others in the organization when CNO turnover does SN - 1096-9012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18421994/Chief_nursing_officer_retention_and_turnover:_a_crisis_brewing_Results_of_a_national_survey_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=18421994.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -