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Women with intellectual disability at risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes.
J Intellect Disabil Res. 2008 Jun; 52(Pt 6):529-35.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

An increasing number of women with intellectual disability (ID) have children. Cross-sectional, clinical population data suggest that these women face an increased risk of delivering preterm and/or low birthweight babies. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of poor pregnancy and birth outcomes in women with ID and/or self-reported learning difficulties in an antenatal population.

METHODS

A total of 878 pregnant women attending their first antenatal clinic visit were 'screened' for ID. Pregnancy and birth outcomes data were extracted from medical records post-partum. These data included pregnancy-related health conditions, including pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes, and birth outcomes, including gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score and admission to neonatal intensive care and/or special care nursery.

RESULTS

A total of 57 (6.5%) pregnant women with ID and/or self-reported learning difficulties were identified. These women experienced an unusually high rate of pre-eclampsia (odds ratio = 2.85). Their children more often had low birthweights (odds ratio = 3.08), and they were more frequently admitted to neonatal intensive care or special care nursery (odds ratio = 2.51).

CONCLUSION

Further research is needed to understand the reasons for the adverse findings of this study and identify potentially changeable factors contributing to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes for women with ID and/or self-reported learning difficulties and their children. To ensure quality antenatal care, health professionals may need to consider innovations such as extended consultation times, communication aids and audio-taping consultations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. David.McConnell@ualberta.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18422528

Citation

McConnell, D, et al. "Women With Intellectual Disability at Risk of Adverse Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes." Journal of Intellectual Disability Research : JIDR, vol. 52, no. Pt 6, 2008, pp. 529-35.
McConnell D, Mayes R, Llewellyn G. Women with intellectual disability at risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. J Intellect Disabil Res. 2008;52(Pt 6):529-35.
McConnell, D., Mayes, R., & Llewellyn, G. (2008). Women with intellectual disability at risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research : JIDR, 52(Pt 6), 529-35. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2788.2008.01061.x
McConnell D, Mayes R, Llewellyn G. Women With Intellectual Disability at Risk of Adverse Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes. J Intellect Disabil Res. 2008;52(Pt 6):529-35. PubMed PMID: 18422528.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Women with intellectual disability at risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. AU - McConnell,D, AU - Mayes,R, AU - Llewellyn,G, Y1 - 2008/04/15/ PY - 2008/4/22/pubmed PY - 2008/8/8/medline PY - 2008/4/22/entrez SP - 529 EP - 35 JF - Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR JO - J Intellect Disabil Res VL - 52 IS - Pt 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: An increasing number of women with intellectual disability (ID) have children. Cross-sectional, clinical population data suggest that these women face an increased risk of delivering preterm and/or low birthweight babies. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of poor pregnancy and birth outcomes in women with ID and/or self-reported learning difficulties in an antenatal population. METHODS: A total of 878 pregnant women attending their first antenatal clinic visit were 'screened' for ID. Pregnancy and birth outcomes data were extracted from medical records post-partum. These data included pregnancy-related health conditions, including pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes, and birth outcomes, including gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score and admission to neonatal intensive care and/or special care nursery. RESULTS: A total of 57 (6.5%) pregnant women with ID and/or self-reported learning difficulties were identified. These women experienced an unusually high rate of pre-eclampsia (odds ratio = 2.85). Their children more often had low birthweights (odds ratio = 3.08), and they were more frequently admitted to neonatal intensive care or special care nursery (odds ratio = 2.51). CONCLUSION: Further research is needed to understand the reasons for the adverse findings of this study and identify potentially changeable factors contributing to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes for women with ID and/or self-reported learning difficulties and their children. To ensure quality antenatal care, health professionals may need to consider innovations such as extended consultation times, communication aids and audio-taping consultations. SN - 1365-2788 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18422528/Women_with_intellectual_disability_at_risk_of_adverse_pregnancy_and_birth_outcomes_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -