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A prospective study of child maltreatment and self-injurious behavior in a community sample.
Dev Psychopathol 2008; 20(2):651-71DP

Abstract

In conjunction with prospective ratings of child maltreatment (i.e., sexual abuse, physical abuse, and physical neglect) and measures of dissociation and somatization, this study examined prospective pathways between child maltreatment and nonsuicidal, direct self-injurious behavior (SIB; e.g., cutting, burning, self-hitting). Ongoing participants in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (N = 164; 83 males, 81 females) completed a semistructured interview about SIB when they were 26 years old. SIB emerged as a heterogeneous and prominent phenomenon in this low-income, mixed-gender, community sample. Child sexual abuse predicted recurrent injuring (i.e., three or more events; n = 13), whereas child physical abuse appeared more salient for intermittent injuring (i.e., one to two events; n = 13). Moreover, these relations appeared largely independent of risk factors that have been associated with child maltreatment and/or SIB, including child cognitive ability, socioeconomic status, maternal life stress, familial disruption, and childhood exposure to partner violence. Dissociation and somatization were related to SIB and, to a lesser degree, child maltreatment. However, only dissociation emerged as a significant mediator of the observed relation between child sexual abuse and recurrent SIB. The findings are discussed within a developmental psychopathology framework in which SIB is viewed as a compensatory regulatory strategy in posttraumatic adaptation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California, 2320 Olmsted Hall, Riverside, CA 92521, USA. tuppett.yates@ucr.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18423099

Citation

Yates, Tuppett M., et al. "A Prospective Study of Child Maltreatment and Self-injurious Behavior in a Community Sample." Development and Psychopathology, vol. 20, no. 2, 2008, pp. 651-71.
Yates TM, Carlson EA, Egeland B. A prospective study of child maltreatment and self-injurious behavior in a community sample. Dev Psychopathol. 2008;20(2):651-71.
Yates, T. M., Carlson, E. A., & Egeland, B. (2008). A prospective study of child maltreatment and self-injurious behavior in a community sample. Development and Psychopathology, 20(2), pp. 651-71. doi:10.1017/S0954579408000321.
Yates TM, Carlson EA, Egeland B. A Prospective Study of Child Maltreatment and Self-injurious Behavior in a Community Sample. Dev Psychopathol. 2008;20(2):651-71. PubMed PMID: 18423099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of child maltreatment and self-injurious behavior in a community sample. AU - Yates,Tuppett M, AU - Carlson,Elizabeth A, AU - Egeland,Byron, PY - 2008/4/22/pubmed PY - 2008/8/23/medline PY - 2008/4/22/entrez SP - 651 EP - 71 JF - Development and psychopathology JO - Dev. Psychopathol. VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - In conjunction with prospective ratings of child maltreatment (i.e., sexual abuse, physical abuse, and physical neglect) and measures of dissociation and somatization, this study examined prospective pathways between child maltreatment and nonsuicidal, direct self-injurious behavior (SIB; e.g., cutting, burning, self-hitting). Ongoing participants in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (N = 164; 83 males, 81 females) completed a semistructured interview about SIB when they were 26 years old. SIB emerged as a heterogeneous and prominent phenomenon in this low-income, mixed-gender, community sample. Child sexual abuse predicted recurrent injuring (i.e., three or more events; n = 13), whereas child physical abuse appeared more salient for intermittent injuring (i.e., one to two events; n = 13). Moreover, these relations appeared largely independent of risk factors that have been associated with child maltreatment and/or SIB, including child cognitive ability, socioeconomic status, maternal life stress, familial disruption, and childhood exposure to partner violence. Dissociation and somatization were related to SIB and, to a lesser degree, child maltreatment. However, only dissociation emerged as a significant mediator of the observed relation between child sexual abuse and recurrent SIB. The findings are discussed within a developmental psychopathology framework in which SIB is viewed as a compensatory regulatory strategy in posttraumatic adaptation. SN - 1469-2198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18423099/A_prospective_study_of_child_maltreatment_and_self_injurious_behavior_in_a_community_sample_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0954579408000321/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -