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Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation.
Prog Transplant. 2008 Mar; 18(1):25-31.PT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ.

OBJECTIVE

To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation.

METHODS

One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health.

RESULTS

Slightly more than half the patients (56.1%) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6).

CONCLUSION

White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18429579

Citation

Rodrigue, James R., et al. "Patients' Willingness to Talk to Others About Living Kidney Donation." Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), vol. 18, no. 1, 2008, pp. 25-31.
Rodrigue JR, Cornell DL, Kaplan B, et al. Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Prog Transplant. 2008;18(1):25-31.
Rodrigue, J. R., Cornell, D. L., Kaplan, B., & Howard, R. J. (2008). Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 18(1), 25-31.
Rodrigue JR, et al. Patients' Willingness to Talk to Others About Living Kidney Donation. Prog Transplant. 2008;18(1):25-31. PubMed PMID: 18429579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. AU - Rodrigue,James R, AU - Cornell,Danielle L, AU - Kaplan,Bruce, AU - Howard,Richard J, PY - 2008/4/24/pubmed PY - 2008/5/30/medline PY - 2008/4/24/entrez SP - 25 EP - 31 JF - Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) JO - Prog Transplant VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ. OBJECTIVE: To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. METHODS: One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health. RESULTS: Slightly more than half the patients (56.1%) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6). CONCLUSION: White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation. SN - 1526-9248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18429579/Patients'_willingness_to_talk_to_others_about_living_kidney_donation_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/kidneyfailure.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -