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Optimal transplant education for recipients to increase pursuit of living donation.
Prog Transplant. 2008 Mar; 18(1):55-62.PT

Abstract

CONTEXT

Inadequate transplant education may stop kidney patients from beginning or completing evaluation or limit recipients from considering living donation.

OBJECTIVE

To learn about recipients' decision making about living donation and preferred transplant education resources.

DESIGN

Retrospective, cross-sectional survey.

PATIENTS

304 kidney recipients.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Living donation comfort, concerns, education preferences.

RESULTS

Recipients spent 10 median hours learning about transplant, primarily by speaking to medical staff (2-3 hours) and reading transplant brochures (0-1 hour). Twelve percent had not received any education before coming to the transplant center. At least 75% wanted education discussing the evaluation, surgery, and medical tests required of recipients and donors, as well as common transplant-related fears. Recipients who received living donor transplants were more interested in information about donors' evaluation (P < .001), surgery (P < .001), medical tests (P < .001), and donation concerns (P = .004) than were other recipients. Recipients who had living donors evaluated were more comfortable accepting family members or friends who volunteered rather than asking potential donors because of concerns about pressuring donors (85%), harming their health (83%), or causing them pain or inconvenience (76%). Besides providing accurate medical information, education that addresses recipients' fears about transplantation, explains living donors' donation experiences, and teaches patients how to pursue living donation may increase recipients' pursuit of living donation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18429583

Citation

Waterman, Amy D., et al. "Optimal Transplant Education for Recipients to Increase Pursuit of Living Donation." Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), vol. 18, no. 1, 2008, pp. 55-62.
Waterman AD, Barrett AC, Stanley SL. Optimal transplant education for recipients to increase pursuit of living donation. Prog Transplant. 2008;18(1):55-62.
Waterman, A. D., Barrett, A. C., & Stanley, S. L. (2008). Optimal transplant education for recipients to increase pursuit of living donation. Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 18(1), 55-62.
Waterman AD, Barrett AC, Stanley SL. Optimal Transplant Education for Recipients to Increase Pursuit of Living Donation. Prog Transplant. 2008;18(1):55-62. PubMed PMID: 18429583.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Optimal transplant education for recipients to increase pursuit of living donation. AU - Waterman,Amy D, AU - Barrett,Ann C, AU - Stanley,Sara L, PY - 2008/4/24/pubmed PY - 2008/5/30/medline PY - 2008/4/24/entrez SP - 55 EP - 62 JF - Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) JO - Prog Transplant VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - CONTEXT: Inadequate transplant education may stop kidney patients from beginning or completing evaluation or limit recipients from considering living donation. OBJECTIVE: To learn about recipients' decision making about living donation and preferred transplant education resources. DESIGN: Retrospective, cross-sectional survey. PATIENTS: 304 kidney recipients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Living donation comfort, concerns, education preferences. RESULTS: Recipients spent 10 median hours learning about transplant, primarily by speaking to medical staff (2-3 hours) and reading transplant brochures (0-1 hour). Twelve percent had not received any education before coming to the transplant center. At least 75% wanted education discussing the evaluation, surgery, and medical tests required of recipients and donors, as well as common transplant-related fears. Recipients who received living donor transplants were more interested in information about donors' evaluation (P < .001), surgery (P < .001), medical tests (P < .001), and donation concerns (P = .004) than were other recipients. Recipients who had living donors evaluated were more comfortable accepting family members or friends who volunteered rather than asking potential donors because of concerns about pressuring donors (85%), harming their health (83%), or causing them pain or inconvenience (76%). Besides providing accurate medical information, education that addresses recipients' fears about transplantation, explains living donors' donation experiences, and teaches patients how to pursue living donation may increase recipients' pursuit of living donation. SN - 1526-9248 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18429583/Optimal_transplant_education_for_recipients_to_increase_pursuit_of_living_donation_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/kidneytransplantation.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -