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Beverage preference and risk of alcohol-use disorders: a Danish prospective cohort study.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2008 May; 69(3):371-7.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to examine whether preferred type of alcoholic beverage influences the later risk of alcohol-use disorders (AUD).

METHOD

A prospective cohort study was used, comprising three updated measures of alcohol intake and covariates, and 26 years of follow-up data on 18,146 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark. The study population was linked to three different registers to detect AUD registrations.

RESULTS

For both genders, wine drinking was associated with lower risk of AUD irrespective of the weekly amount of alcohol consumed. Women drinking 15-21 drinks per week of only beer and distilled spirits had a risk of 15.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-33.3) for AUD, whereas those whose total alcohol intake comprised more than 35% wine had a risk of 2.0 (CI: 0.7-5.2). Men drinking 15-21 drinks per week of only beer and distilled spirits had a risk of 3.1 (CI: 1.8-5.4), whereas those whose total alcohol intake comprised more than 35% wine had a risk of 0.8 (CI: 0.3-2.1). Consuming more than 35% beer increased the risk of AUD for women, whereas the percentage of distilled spirits intake did not influence the risk of AUD for either women or men.

CONCLUSIONS

Individuals who include wine when they drink alcohol have lower risks of AUD, independent of the total amount of alcohol consumed. The most likely explanation of these results is that lifestyle factors and personal characteristics are associated with beverage preference.

Authors+Show Affiliations

H:S Institute of Preventive Medicine, Center for Health and Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. tfm@niph.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18432379

Citation

Flensborg-Madsen, Trine, et al. "Beverage Preference and Risk of Alcohol-use Disorders: a Danish Prospective Cohort Study." Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 69, no. 3, 2008, pp. 371-7.
Flensborg-Madsen T, Knop J, Mortensen EL, et al. Beverage preference and risk of alcohol-use disorders: a Danish prospective cohort study. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2008;69(3):371-7.
Flensborg-Madsen, T., Knop, J., Mortensen, E. L., Becker, U., Makhija, N., Sher, L., & Grønbaek, M. (2008). Beverage preference and risk of alcohol-use disorders: a Danish prospective cohort study. Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, 69(3), 371-7.
Flensborg-Madsen T, et al. Beverage Preference and Risk of Alcohol-use Disorders: a Danish Prospective Cohort Study. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2008;69(3):371-7. PubMed PMID: 18432379.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beverage preference and risk of alcohol-use disorders: a Danish prospective cohort study. AU - Flensborg-Madsen,Trine, AU - Knop,Joachim, AU - Mortensen,Erik Lykke, AU - Becker,Ulrik, AU - Makhija,Nita, AU - Sher,Leo, AU - Grønbaek,Morten, PY - 2008/4/25/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/4/25/entrez SP - 371 EP - 7 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs JO - J Stud Alcohol Drugs VL - 69 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine whether preferred type of alcoholic beverage influences the later risk of alcohol-use disorders (AUD). METHOD: A prospective cohort study was used, comprising three updated measures of alcohol intake and covariates, and 26 years of follow-up data on 18,146 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark. The study population was linked to three different registers to detect AUD registrations. RESULTS: For both genders, wine drinking was associated with lower risk of AUD irrespective of the weekly amount of alcohol consumed. Women drinking 15-21 drinks per week of only beer and distilled spirits had a risk of 15.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-33.3) for AUD, whereas those whose total alcohol intake comprised more than 35% wine had a risk of 2.0 (CI: 0.7-5.2). Men drinking 15-21 drinks per week of only beer and distilled spirits had a risk of 3.1 (CI: 1.8-5.4), whereas those whose total alcohol intake comprised more than 35% wine had a risk of 0.8 (CI: 0.3-2.1). Consuming more than 35% beer increased the risk of AUD for women, whereas the percentage of distilled spirits intake did not influence the risk of AUD for either women or men. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals who include wine when they drink alcohol have lower risks of AUD, independent of the total amount of alcohol consumed. The most likely explanation of these results is that lifestyle factors and personal characteristics are associated with beverage preference. SN - 1937-1888 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18432379/Beverage_preference_and_risk_of_alcohol_use_disorders:_a_Danish_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsad.2008.69.371 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -