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Smoking-attributable periodontal disease in the Australian adult population.
J Clin Periodontol. 2008 May; 35(5):398-404.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The extent to which periodontitis is attributable to smoking in Australia has not been examined.

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the smoking-periodontitis relationship and to estimate the public health impact of smoking on periodontitis in Australia.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

The National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-2006 collected nationally representative oral epidemiologic data for the Australian adult population. Examiners measured probing pocket depth (PPD) and gingival recession at three sites per tooth to compute clinical attachment level (CAL). Moderate-severe cases were defined as having: >/=2 interproximal sites (not on same tooth) with >/=4 mm CAL or with >/=5 mm PPD. Smoking status was defined as never-, former- or current-smoker. Current-smokers were further classified into light-, moderate- or heavy-smoker using calculated pack-years. Age, sex and socioeconomic position were examined as potential confounders.

RESULTS

Twenty-three per cent were former-smokers and 15% were current-smokers. Prevalence of periodontitis was 23%. In unadjusted analyses, former- and current-smokers had significantly higher periodontitis prevalence than never-smokers. Relative to non-smokers, adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval) for periodontitis were as follows: former-smokers: 1.22 (1.03-1.46), moderate-smokers: 1.63 (1.16-2.30); and heavy-smokers: 1.64 (1.27-2.12). The population attributable fraction of smoking for moderate-severe periodontitis was 32% (equivalent to 700,000 adults).

CONCLUSION

Smoking has a significant impact on periodontal health of the Australian adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia. loc.do@adelaide.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18433383

Citation

Do, Loc G., et al. "Smoking-attributable Periodontal Disease in the Australian Adult Population." Journal of Clinical Periodontology, vol. 35, no. 5, 2008, pp. 398-404.
Do LG, Slade GD, Roberts-Thomson KF, et al. Smoking-attributable periodontal disease in the Australian adult population. J Clin Periodontol. 2008;35(5):398-404.
Do, L. G., Slade, G. D., Roberts-Thomson, K. F., & Sanders, A. E. (2008). Smoking-attributable periodontal disease in the Australian adult population. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 35(5), 398-404. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01223.x
Do LG, et al. Smoking-attributable Periodontal Disease in the Australian Adult Population. J Clin Periodontol. 2008;35(5):398-404. PubMed PMID: 18433383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking-attributable periodontal disease in the Australian adult population. AU - Do,Loc G, AU - Slade,Gary D, AU - Roberts-Thomson,Kaye F, AU - Sanders,Anne E, PY - 2008/4/25/pubmed PY - 2008/6/3/medline PY - 2008/4/25/entrez SP - 398 EP - 404 JF - Journal of clinical periodontology JO - J Clin Periodontol VL - 35 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The extent to which periodontitis is attributable to smoking in Australia has not been examined. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the smoking-periodontitis relationship and to estimate the public health impact of smoking on periodontitis in Australia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-2006 collected nationally representative oral epidemiologic data for the Australian adult population. Examiners measured probing pocket depth (PPD) and gingival recession at three sites per tooth to compute clinical attachment level (CAL). Moderate-severe cases were defined as having: >/=2 interproximal sites (not on same tooth) with >/=4 mm CAL or with >/=5 mm PPD. Smoking status was defined as never-, former- or current-smoker. Current-smokers were further classified into light-, moderate- or heavy-smoker using calculated pack-years. Age, sex and socioeconomic position were examined as potential confounders. RESULTS: Twenty-three per cent were former-smokers and 15% were current-smokers. Prevalence of periodontitis was 23%. In unadjusted analyses, former- and current-smokers had significantly higher periodontitis prevalence than never-smokers. Relative to non-smokers, adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval) for periodontitis were as follows: former-smokers: 1.22 (1.03-1.46), moderate-smokers: 1.63 (1.16-2.30); and heavy-smokers: 1.64 (1.27-2.12). The population attributable fraction of smoking for moderate-severe periodontitis was 32% (equivalent to 700,000 adults). CONCLUSION: Smoking has a significant impact on periodontal health of the Australian adults. SN - 1600-051X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18433383/Smoking_attributable_periodontal_disease_in_the_Australian_adult_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01223.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -