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Improved antibody responses in infants less than 1 year old using intradermal influenza vaccination.
Vaccine. 2008 May 23; 26(22):2700-5.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Antibody response to influenza vaccine is limited in early. Infants have poorer hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody responses than 12-month-old. Intradermal administration reportedly elicited immune responses similar to or better than a standard intramuscular dose. We hypothesized that intradermal injection could achieve a better response in infants than subcutaneous injection.

METHODS

We randomized 34 healthy infants 6-12 months old to either intradermal immunization (0.1 ml of trivalent influenza vaccine containing at least 3 microg of hemagglutinin antigen per strain) or subcutaneous immunization (also 0.1 ml). Changes in hemagglutination inhibition titer were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test, changes in positivity rate, seroconversion, and seroprotection. Local and systemic adverse events were assessed.

RESULTS

All 32 infants received both injections. Antibody titers on days at 42 after intradermal injection were significantly greater than subcutaneous injection (P=0.032 in A/New Caledonia (H1N1), 0.019 in A New York (H3N2) and 0.044 in B/Shanghai. Positive titers for A New York (H3N2) were attained significantly more often after intradermal (73.3%) than subcutaneous injection (23.5%) on day 28, and significantly more often 42 days after intradermal injection (93.3% for A/New Caledonia (H1N1) and 73.3% for B/Shanghai) than after subcutaneous injection. Positive rates for other stains were similar between groups on days 28 and 42. Seroconversion rates were similar between groups. Seroprotection on day 42 for A New York (H3N2) was significantly greater in the intradermal (86.7%) than in the subcutaneous group (35.3%). Seroprotection rates for other stains were similar.

CONCLUSIONS

Intradermal administration to infants of two doses of influenza vaccine was more immunogenic than subcutaneous injection. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates remained insufficient. Further study of route, quantity, and frequency are needed to improve of responses in infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sugimura Children's Medical Clinic, Chikugo, Japan. sugimura@kurume.ktarn.or.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18436353

Citation

Sugimura, Tetsu, et al. "Improved Antibody Responses in Infants Less Than 1 Year Old Using Intradermal Influenza Vaccination." Vaccine, vol. 26, no. 22, 2008, pp. 2700-5.
Sugimura T, Ito Y, Tananari Y, et al. Improved antibody responses in infants less than 1 year old using intradermal influenza vaccination. Vaccine. 2008;26(22):2700-5.
Sugimura, T., Ito, Y., Tananari, Y., Ozaki, Y., Maeno, Y., Yamaoka, T., & Kudo, Y. (2008). Improved antibody responses in infants less than 1 year old using intradermal influenza vaccination. Vaccine, 26(22), 2700-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.03.016
Sugimura T, et al. Improved Antibody Responses in Infants Less Than 1 Year Old Using Intradermal Influenza Vaccination. Vaccine. 2008 May 23;26(22):2700-5. PubMed PMID: 18436353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Improved antibody responses in infants less than 1 year old using intradermal influenza vaccination. AU - Sugimura,Tetsu, AU - Ito,Yuhei, AU - Tananari,Yoshifumi, AU - Ozaki,Yukiko, AU - Maeno,Yasuki, AU - Yamaoka,Toshihiko, AU - Kudo,Yoshiyuki, Y1 - 2008/03/31/ PY - 2007/10/17/received PY - 2008/02/20/revised PY - 2008/03/13/accepted PY - 2008/4/26/pubmed PY - 2008/7/18/medline PY - 2008/4/26/entrez SP - 2700 EP - 5 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 26 IS - 22 N2 - BACKGROUND: Antibody response to influenza vaccine is limited in early. Infants have poorer hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody responses than 12-month-old. Intradermal administration reportedly elicited immune responses similar to or better than a standard intramuscular dose. We hypothesized that intradermal injection could achieve a better response in infants than subcutaneous injection. METHODS: We randomized 34 healthy infants 6-12 months old to either intradermal immunization (0.1 ml of trivalent influenza vaccine containing at least 3 microg of hemagglutinin antigen per strain) or subcutaneous immunization (also 0.1 ml). Changes in hemagglutination inhibition titer were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test, changes in positivity rate, seroconversion, and seroprotection. Local and systemic adverse events were assessed. RESULTS: All 32 infants received both injections. Antibody titers on days at 42 after intradermal injection were significantly greater than subcutaneous injection (P=0.032 in A/New Caledonia (H1N1), 0.019 in A New York (H3N2) and 0.044 in B/Shanghai. Positive titers for A New York (H3N2) were attained significantly more often after intradermal (73.3%) than subcutaneous injection (23.5%) on day 28, and significantly more often 42 days after intradermal injection (93.3% for A/New Caledonia (H1N1) and 73.3% for B/Shanghai) than after subcutaneous injection. Positive rates for other stains were similar between groups on days 28 and 42. Seroconversion rates were similar between groups. Seroprotection on day 42 for A New York (H3N2) was significantly greater in the intradermal (86.7%) than in the subcutaneous group (35.3%). Seroprotection rates for other stains were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Intradermal administration to infants of two doses of influenza vaccine was more immunogenic than subcutaneous injection. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates remained insufficient. Further study of route, quantity, and frequency are needed to improve of responses in infants. SN - 0264-410X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18436353/Improved_antibody_responses_in_infants_less_than_1_year_old_using_intradermal_influenza_vaccination_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(08)00318-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -