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Sleep in children improves memory performance on declarative but not procedural tasks.
Learn Mem. 2008 May; 15(5):373-7.LM

Abstract

Sleep supports the consolidation of memory in adults. Childhood is a period hallmarked by huge demands of brain plasticity as well as great amounts of efficient sleep. Whether sleep supports memory consolidation in children as in adults is unclear. We compared effects of nocturnal sleep (versus daytime wakefulness) on consolidation of declarative (word-pair associates, two-dimensional [2D] object location), and procedural memories (finger sequence tapping) in 15 children (6-8 yr) and 15 adults. Beneficial effects of sleep on retention of declarative memories were comparable in children and adults. However, opposite to adults, children showed smaller improvement in finger-tapping skill across retention sleep than wakefulness, indicating that sleep-dependent procedural memory consolidation depends on developmental stage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroendocrinology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck 23538, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18441295

Citation

Wilhelm, Ines, et al. "Sleep in Children Improves Memory Performance On Declarative but Not Procedural Tasks." Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.), vol. 15, no. 5, 2008, pp. 373-7.
Wilhelm I, Diekelmann S, Born J. Sleep in children improves memory performance on declarative but not procedural tasks. Learn Mem. 2008;15(5):373-7.
Wilhelm, I., Diekelmann, S., & Born, J. (2008). Sleep in children improves memory performance on declarative but not procedural tasks. Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.), 15(5), 373-7. https://doi.org/10.1101/lm.803708
Wilhelm I, Diekelmann S, Born J. Sleep in Children Improves Memory Performance On Declarative but Not Procedural Tasks. Learn Mem. 2008;15(5):373-7. PubMed PMID: 18441295.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep in children improves memory performance on declarative but not procedural tasks. AU - Wilhelm,Ines, AU - Diekelmann,Susanne, AU - Born,Jan, Y1 - 2008/04/25/ PY - 2008/4/29/pubmed PY - 2008/7/22/medline PY - 2008/4/29/entrez SP - 373 EP - 7 JF - Learning & memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) JO - Learn Mem VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - Sleep supports the consolidation of memory in adults. Childhood is a period hallmarked by huge demands of brain plasticity as well as great amounts of efficient sleep. Whether sleep supports memory consolidation in children as in adults is unclear. We compared effects of nocturnal sleep (versus daytime wakefulness) on consolidation of declarative (word-pair associates, two-dimensional [2D] object location), and procedural memories (finger sequence tapping) in 15 children (6-8 yr) and 15 adults. Beneficial effects of sleep on retention of declarative memories were comparable in children and adults. However, opposite to adults, children showed smaller improvement in finger-tapping skill across retention sleep than wakefulness, indicating that sleep-dependent procedural memory consolidation depends on developmental stage. SN - 1549-5485 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18441295/Sleep_in_children_improves_memory_performance_on_declarative_but_not_procedural_tasks_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -