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Persistent hot flushes in older postmenopausal women.
Arch Intern Med. 2008 Apr 28; 168(8):840-6.AI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the prevalence, natural history, and predictors of hot flushes in older postmenopausal women.

METHODS

Prevalence, severity, and 3-year change in severity of hot flushes were assessed by questionnaire in 3167 older postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Logistic regression was used to identify characteristics associated with symptoms at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up.

RESULTS

At baseline, 375 women (11.8%) reported bothersome hot flushes. Women were more likely to have baseline symptoms if they were less educated (odds ratio [OR], 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.53 per 4-year decrease), more recently menopausal (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.34-1.56 per 5-year decrease), had previously used estrogen (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.23-2.00), or had undergone hysterectomy (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.14-1.99). Hot flushes were also associated with higher body mass index (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.38 per 1 SD), higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.20-1.51 per 1 SD), lower high-density lipoprotein levels (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.03-1.34 per 1 SD decrease), vaginal dryness (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.19-1.93), and trouble sleeping (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.94-3.16), but not estradiol levels. Of the 375 women with baseline symptoms, 278 contributed 3-year data, and 157 (56.5%) of these women reported persistent symptoms after 3 years. Fewer years since menopause (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.32 per 5-year decrease) and trouble sleeping (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.19-3.26) were associated with symptom persistence.

CONCLUSIONS

For a substantial minority of women, hot flushes are a persistent source of discomfort into the late postmenopausal years. Identification of risk factors for hot flushes may help guide evaluation and treatment in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, USA. ahuang@ucsfmed.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18443259

Citation

Huang, Alison J., et al. "Persistent Hot Flushes in Older Postmenopausal Women." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 168, no. 8, 2008, pp. 840-6.
Huang AJ, Grady D, Jacoby VL, et al. Persistent hot flushes in older postmenopausal women. Arch Intern Med. 2008;168(8):840-6.
Huang, A. J., Grady, D., Jacoby, V. L., Blackwell, T. L., Bauer, D. C., & Sawaya, G. F. (2008). Persistent hot flushes in older postmenopausal women. Archives of Internal Medicine, 168(8), 840-6. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.168.8.840
Huang AJ, et al. Persistent Hot Flushes in Older Postmenopausal Women. Arch Intern Med. 2008 Apr 28;168(8):840-6. PubMed PMID: 18443259.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Persistent hot flushes in older postmenopausal women. AU - Huang,Alison J, AU - Grady,Deborah, AU - Jacoby,Vanessa L, AU - Blackwell,Terri L, AU - Bauer,Douglas C, AU - Sawaya,George F, PY - 2008/4/30/pubmed PY - 2008/8/5/medline PY - 2008/4/30/entrez SP - 840 EP - 6 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 168 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence, natural history, and predictors of hot flushes in older postmenopausal women. METHODS: Prevalence, severity, and 3-year change in severity of hot flushes were assessed by questionnaire in 3167 older postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Logistic regression was used to identify characteristics associated with symptoms at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up. RESULTS: At baseline, 375 women (11.8%) reported bothersome hot flushes. Women were more likely to have baseline symptoms if they were less educated (odds ratio [OR], 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.53 per 4-year decrease), more recently menopausal (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.34-1.56 per 5-year decrease), had previously used estrogen (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.23-2.00), or had undergone hysterectomy (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.14-1.99). Hot flushes were also associated with higher body mass index (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.38 per 1 SD), higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.20-1.51 per 1 SD), lower high-density lipoprotein levels (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.03-1.34 per 1 SD decrease), vaginal dryness (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.19-1.93), and trouble sleeping (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.94-3.16), but not estradiol levels. Of the 375 women with baseline symptoms, 278 contributed 3-year data, and 157 (56.5%) of these women reported persistent symptoms after 3 years. Fewer years since menopause (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.32 per 5-year decrease) and trouble sleeping (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.19-3.26) were associated with symptom persistence. CONCLUSIONS: For a substantial minority of women, hot flushes are a persistent source of discomfort into the late postmenopausal years. Identification of risk factors for hot flushes may help guide evaluation and treatment in this population. SN - 1538-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18443259/Persistent_hot_flushes_in_older_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.168.8.840 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -