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Physicians' knowledge and attitudes regarding periconceptional folic acid supplementation: a survey in Southern Israel.
Med Sci Monit. 2008 May; 14(5):CR262-267.MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pre-conceptional folic acid supplementation is an effective way to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs). Primary care providers are an important source of information to promote folic acid intake. This study aimed at evaluating primary care physicians' knowledge and attitudes regarding folic acid supplementation for childbearing women.

MATERIAL/METHODS

A questionnaire on physicians' knowledge and attitudes, mostly including multiple-choice questions, was delivered by mail to all physicians (n=370) in a large health provider organization in southern Israel in 2006. Data regarding demographics as well as type of specialty, experience, and place of work were collected.

RESULTS

Eighty-seven physicians were included in the study (response rate: 24%). Seventy physicians out of 81 (94%) reported routine recommendation of folic acid for their patients. Most physicians admitted that they needed more information regarding folic acid supplementation. Knowledge about folic acid's role in preventing congenital anomalies was suboptimal, with 2% of the physicians correctly estimating the efficacy of folic acid in decreasing the risk of NTDs and 8% recognizing the association between folic acid supplementation and decreased prevalence of malformations other than NTDs. Knowledge about the correct timing (12%) and dosage (47%) of folic acid preparations for average-risk women was also lacking.

CONCLUSIONS

Primary care physicians report that they routinely prescribe folic acid to women in childbearing age in order to prevent congenital anomalies, but their knowledge about folic acid supplementation is insufficient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clalit Health Services, Southern District, Beer Sheva, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18443550

Citation

Abu-Hammad, Talab, et al. "Physicians' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Periconceptional Folic Acid Supplementation: a Survey in Southern Israel." Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 14, no. 5, 2008, pp. CR262-267.
Abu-Hammad T, Dreiher J, Vardy DA, et al. Physicians' knowledge and attitudes regarding periconceptional folic acid supplementation: a survey in Southern Israel. Med Sci Monit. 2008;14(5):CR262-267.
Abu-Hammad, T., Dreiher, J., Vardy, D. A., & Cohen, A. D. (2008). Physicians' knowledge and attitudes regarding periconceptional folic acid supplementation: a survey in Southern Israel. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, 14(5), CR262-267.
Abu-Hammad T, et al. Physicians' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Periconceptional Folic Acid Supplementation: a Survey in Southern Israel. Med Sci Monit. 2008;14(5):CR262-267. PubMed PMID: 18443550.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physicians' knowledge and attitudes regarding periconceptional folic acid supplementation: a survey in Southern Israel. AU - Abu-Hammad,Talab, AU - Dreiher,Jacob, AU - Vardy,Daniel A, AU - Cohen,Arnon D, PY - 2008/4/30/pubmed PY - 2008/8/12/medline PY - 2008/4/30/entrez SP - CR262 EP - 267 JF - Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research JO - Med Sci Monit VL - 14 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pre-conceptional folic acid supplementation is an effective way to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs). Primary care providers are an important source of information to promote folic acid intake. This study aimed at evaluating primary care physicians' knowledge and attitudes regarding folic acid supplementation for childbearing women. MATERIAL/METHODS: A questionnaire on physicians' knowledge and attitudes, mostly including multiple-choice questions, was delivered by mail to all physicians (n=370) in a large health provider organization in southern Israel in 2006. Data regarding demographics as well as type of specialty, experience, and place of work were collected. RESULTS: Eighty-seven physicians were included in the study (response rate: 24%). Seventy physicians out of 81 (94%) reported routine recommendation of folic acid for their patients. Most physicians admitted that they needed more information regarding folic acid supplementation. Knowledge about folic acid's role in preventing congenital anomalies was suboptimal, with 2% of the physicians correctly estimating the efficacy of folic acid in decreasing the risk of NTDs and 8% recognizing the association between folic acid supplementation and decreased prevalence of malformations other than NTDs. Knowledge about the correct timing (12%) and dosage (47%) of folic acid preparations for average-risk women was also lacking. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians report that they routinely prescribe folic acid to women in childbearing age in order to prevent congenital anomalies, but their knowledge about folic acid supplementation is insufficient. SN - 1234-1010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18443550/Physicians'_knowledge_and_attitudes_regarding_periconceptional_folic_acid_supplementation:_a_survey_in_Southern_Israel_ L2 - https://www.medscimonit.com/download/index/idArt/855752 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -