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Cosleeping versus solitary sleeping in children with bedtime problems: child emotional problems and parental distress.
Behav Sleep Med. 2008; 6(2):89-105.BS

Abstract

This study investigated sleep, behavioral and emotional problems, and parental relationships and psychological distress in a group of school-aged children with bedtime problems and persistent cosleeping, compared to solitary sleepers and controls. Participants were 148 school-aged children with bedtime problems (44 cosleepers, 104 solitary sleepers) and 228 healthy peers. Results suggested that cosleepers have a significantly later bedtime, shorter nighttime sleep duration, higher Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) bedtime resistance and sleep anxiety scores, and more behavioral and emotional problems compared to other groups. Parents of cosleepers have a significantly higher level of psychological and couple distress. A past history of sleep problems, couple and maternal distress, CSHQ bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, and night wakings subscale scores, and nighttime fears were significantly predictive of cosleeping. Thus, when cosleeping is present, the child's emotional adjustment, family relationships, and parental psychological problems should be investigated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders, Department of Developmental Neurology & Psychiatry, University of Rome, La Sapienza, Italy. flavia.cortesi@uniroma1.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18443948

Citation

Cortesi, Flavia, et al. "Cosleeping Versus Solitary Sleeping in Children With Bedtime Problems: Child Emotional Problems and Parental Distress." Behavioral Sleep Medicine, vol. 6, no. 2, 2008, pp. 89-105.
Cortesi F, Giannotti F, Sebastiani T, et al. Cosleeping versus solitary sleeping in children with bedtime problems: child emotional problems and parental distress. Behav Sleep Med. 2008;6(2):89-105.
Cortesi, F., Giannotti, F., Sebastiani, T., Vagnoni, C., & Marioni, P. (2008). Cosleeping versus solitary sleeping in children with bedtime problems: child emotional problems and parental distress. Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 6(2), 89-105. https://doi.org/10.1080/15402000801952922
Cortesi F, et al. Cosleeping Versus Solitary Sleeping in Children With Bedtime Problems: Child Emotional Problems and Parental Distress. Behav Sleep Med. 2008;6(2):89-105. PubMed PMID: 18443948.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cosleeping versus solitary sleeping in children with bedtime problems: child emotional problems and parental distress. AU - Cortesi,Flavia, AU - Giannotti,Flavia, AU - Sebastiani,Teresa, AU - Vagnoni,Cristina, AU - Marioni,Patrizia, PY - 2008/4/30/pubmed PY - 2008/6/21/medline PY - 2008/4/30/entrez SP - 89 EP - 105 JF - Behavioral sleep medicine JO - Behav Sleep Med VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - This study investigated sleep, behavioral and emotional problems, and parental relationships and psychological distress in a group of school-aged children with bedtime problems and persistent cosleeping, compared to solitary sleepers and controls. Participants were 148 school-aged children with bedtime problems (44 cosleepers, 104 solitary sleepers) and 228 healthy peers. Results suggested that cosleepers have a significantly later bedtime, shorter nighttime sleep duration, higher Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) bedtime resistance and sleep anxiety scores, and more behavioral and emotional problems compared to other groups. Parents of cosleepers have a significantly higher level of psychological and couple distress. A past history of sleep problems, couple and maternal distress, CSHQ bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, and night wakings subscale scores, and nighttime fears were significantly predictive of cosleeping. Thus, when cosleeping is present, the child's emotional adjustment, family relationships, and parental psychological problems should be investigated. SN - 1540-2010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18443948/Cosleeping_versus_solitary_sleeping_in_children_with_bedtime_problems:_child_emotional_problems_and_parental_distress_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15402000801952922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -