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Dietary factors and breast cancer risk: a case control study among a population in Southern France.

Abstract

This case-control study examined different food groups in relation to breast cancer. Between 2002 and 2004, 437 cases and 922 controls matched according to age and area of residence were interviewed. Diet was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Adjusted odds ratios (Ors) were computed across levels of various dietary intakes identified by two methods: the "classical" and the "spline" methods. Neither of the 2 methods found an association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and breast cancer. Results of the 2 methods showed a nonsignificant decreased association with cooked vegetables intake as well as legumes and fish consumption. Whereas the spline method showed no association, the classical method showed significant associations related to the lowest consumption of raw vegetables or dairy products and breast cancer risk: Adjusted OR for raw vegetable consumption between (67.4 and 101.3 g/day) vs. (< 67.4 g/day) was 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.43-0.93]. Adjusted OR for dairy consumption between (134.3 and 271.2 g/day) vs. (< 134.3 g/day) was 1.57 (95% CI = 1.06-2.32). However, the overall results were not consistent. Compared to the classical method, the use of the spline method showed a significant association for cereal, meat, and olive oil. Cereal and olive oil were inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Breast cancer risk increased by 56% for each additional 100 g/day of meat consumption. Studies using novel methodological techniques are needed to confirm the dietary threshold responsible for changes in breast cancer risk. New approaches that consist in analyzing dietary patterns rather than dietary food are necessary.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Laboratoire de Biostatistiques et d'Epidémiologie-Institut Universitaire de Recherche Clinique, Montpellier Cedex, France.

    ,

    Source

    Nutrition and cancer 60:2 2008 pg 177-87

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Breast Neoplasms
    Case-Control Studies
    Dairy Products
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Edible Grain
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    France
    Fruit
    Humans
    Linear Models
    Meat
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Olive Oil
    Plant Oils
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18444149

    Citation

    Bessaoud, Faïza, et al. "Dietary Factors and Breast Cancer Risk: a Case Control Study Among a Population in Southern France." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 60, no. 2, 2008, pp. 177-87.
    Bessaoud F, Daurès JP, Gerber M. Dietary factors and breast cancer risk: a case control study among a population in Southern France. Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(2):177-87.
    Bessaoud, F., Daurès, J. P., & Gerber, M. (2008). Dietary factors and breast cancer risk: a case control study among a population in Southern France. Nutrition and Cancer, 60(2), pp. 177-87. doi:10.1080/01635580701649651.
    Bessaoud F, Daurès JP, Gerber M. Dietary Factors and Breast Cancer Risk: a Case Control Study Among a Population in Southern France. Nutr Cancer. 2008;60(2):177-87. PubMed PMID: 18444149.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary factors and breast cancer risk: a case control study among a population in Southern France. AU - Bessaoud,Faïza, AU - Daurès,Jean-Pierre, AU - Gerber,Mariette, PY - 2008/4/30/pubmed PY - 2008/8/1/medline PY - 2008/4/30/entrez SP - 177 EP - 87 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - This case-control study examined different food groups in relation to breast cancer. Between 2002 and 2004, 437 cases and 922 controls matched according to age and area of residence were interviewed. Diet was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Adjusted odds ratios (Ors) were computed across levels of various dietary intakes identified by two methods: the "classical" and the "spline" methods. Neither of the 2 methods found an association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and breast cancer. Results of the 2 methods showed a nonsignificant decreased association with cooked vegetables intake as well as legumes and fish consumption. Whereas the spline method showed no association, the classical method showed significant associations related to the lowest consumption of raw vegetables or dairy products and breast cancer risk: Adjusted OR for raw vegetable consumption between (67.4 and 101.3 g/day) vs. (< 67.4 g/day) was 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.43-0.93]. Adjusted OR for dairy consumption between (134.3 and 271.2 g/day) vs. (< 134.3 g/day) was 1.57 (95% CI = 1.06-2.32). However, the overall results were not consistent. Compared to the classical method, the use of the spline method showed a significant association for cereal, meat, and olive oil. Cereal and olive oil were inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Breast cancer risk increased by 56% for each additional 100 g/day of meat consumption. Studies using novel methodological techniques are needed to confirm the dietary threshold responsible for changes in breast cancer risk. New approaches that consist in analyzing dietary patterns rather than dietary food are necessary. SN - 0163-5581 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18444149/Dietary_factors_and_breast_cancer_risk:_a_case_control_study_among_a_population_in_Southern_France_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635580701649651 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -