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Forming implicit and explicit attitudes toward individuals: social group association cues.
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008 May; 94(5):792-807.JP

Abstract

The authors explored how social group cues (e.g., obesity, physical attractiveness) strongly associated with valence affect the formation of attitudes toward individuals. Although explicit attitude formation has been examined in much past research (e.g., S. T. Fiske & S. L. Neuberg, 1990), in the current work, the authors considered how implicit as well as explicit attitudes toward individuals are influenced by these cues. On the basis of a systems of evaluation perspective (e.g., R. J. Rydell & A. R. McConnell, 2006; R. J. Rydell, A. R. McConnell, D. M. Mackie, & L. M. Strain, 2006), the authors anticipated and found that social group cues had a strong impact on implicit attitude formation in all cases and on explicit attitude formation when behavioral information about the target was ambiguous. These findings obtained for cues related to obesity (Experiments 1 and 4) and physical attractiveness (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, parallel findings were observed for race, and participants holding greater implicit racial prejudice against African Americans formed more negative implicit attitudes toward a novel African American target person than did participants with less implicit racial prejudice. Implications for research on attitudes, impression formation, and stigma are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA. mcconnar@muohio.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18444739

Citation

McConnell, Allen R., et al. "Forming Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Individuals: Social Group Association Cues." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 94, no. 5, 2008, pp. 792-807.
McConnell AR, Rydell RJ, Strain LM, et al. Forming implicit and explicit attitudes toward individuals: social group association cues. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008;94(5):792-807.
McConnell, A. R., Rydell, R. J., Strain, L. M., & Mackie, D. M. (2008). Forming implicit and explicit attitudes toward individuals: social group association cues. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(5), 792-807. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.94.5.792
McConnell AR, et al. Forming Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Individuals: Social Group Association Cues. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008;94(5):792-807. PubMed PMID: 18444739.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Forming implicit and explicit attitudes toward individuals: social group association cues. AU - McConnell,Allen R, AU - Rydell,Robert J, AU - Strain,Laura M, AU - Mackie,Diane M, PY - 2008/5/1/pubmed PY - 2008/8/12/medline PY - 2008/5/1/entrez SP - 792 EP - 807 JF - Journal of personality and social psychology JO - J Pers Soc Psychol VL - 94 IS - 5 N2 - The authors explored how social group cues (e.g., obesity, physical attractiveness) strongly associated with valence affect the formation of attitudes toward individuals. Although explicit attitude formation has been examined in much past research (e.g., S. T. Fiske & S. L. Neuberg, 1990), in the current work, the authors considered how implicit as well as explicit attitudes toward individuals are influenced by these cues. On the basis of a systems of evaluation perspective (e.g., R. J. Rydell & A. R. McConnell, 2006; R. J. Rydell, A. R. McConnell, D. M. Mackie, & L. M. Strain, 2006), the authors anticipated and found that social group cues had a strong impact on implicit attitude formation in all cases and on explicit attitude formation when behavioral information about the target was ambiguous. These findings obtained for cues related to obesity (Experiments 1 and 4) and physical attractiveness (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, parallel findings were observed for race, and participants holding greater implicit racial prejudice against African Americans formed more negative implicit attitudes toward a novel African American target person than did participants with less implicit racial prejudice. Implications for research on attitudes, impression formation, and stigma are discussed. SN - 0022-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18444739/Forming_implicit_and_explicit_attitudes_toward_individuals:_social_group_association_cues_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/psp/94/5/792 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -