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Early respiratory infections and asthma among New York City Head Start children.
J Asthma. 2008 May; 45(4):301-8.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Respiratory infections in neonates have been found to predict wheeze among young children. We hypothesized that among preschool children from low-income minority communities in New York City, current asthma would be associated with a history of respiratory infection in the first few months after their birth.

METHODS

We asked parents of children in New York City Head Start centers (preschool programs for children of low-income families) to respond to a questionnaire covering demographic factors, lifestyle, home environment, and health history, including a detailed history of respiratory conditions. We used logistic regression to model the association of asthma and asthma severity with history of respiratory infections, controlling for gender, ethnicity, family history of asthma, and other factors.

RESULTS

Among 1,022 children (mean age 4+/- 0.6 years) whose parents provided information about their health history, 359 (35%) met our criteria for asthma. Overall, 22% had had a cold by 6 months and 17% an ear infection by 8 months of age. In multivariable models, children with asthma had had more colds (OR = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-6.0) and ear infections (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.7-6.9) in the past year than other children. Associations of respiratory infections with emergency department use for asthma (as a measure of severity) were similar. In models that did not control for infections in the past year, ages at first cold and first ear infection were associated with asthma and emergency department visits in the past year.

CONCLUSIONS

In this sample of preschool children, respiratory infections were common and were associated with asthma and health care utilization for asthma exacerbations. If these findings are confirmed, preventive measures among children who develop such infections at a very early age should be explored to help reduce the burden of asthma in this age group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. jsj4@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18446594

Citation

Jacobson, Judith S., et al. "Early Respiratory Infections and Asthma Among New York City Head Start Children." The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, vol. 45, no. 4, 2008, pp. 301-8.
Jacobson JS, Goldstein IF, Canfield SM, et al. Early respiratory infections and asthma among New York City Head Start children. J Asthma. 2008;45(4):301-8.
Jacobson, J. S., Goldstein, I. F., Canfield, S. M., Ashby-Thompson, M., Husain, S. A., Chew, G. L., Perzanowski, M. S., Hoepner, L., Garfinkel, R., & Mellins, R. B. (2008). Early respiratory infections and asthma among New York City Head Start children. The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, 45(4), 301-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770900801911186
Jacobson JS, et al. Early Respiratory Infections and Asthma Among New York City Head Start Children. J Asthma. 2008;45(4):301-8. PubMed PMID: 18446594.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early respiratory infections and asthma among New York City Head Start children. AU - Jacobson,Judith S, AU - Goldstein,Inge F, AU - Canfield,Stephen M, AU - Ashby-Thompson,Maxine, AU - Husain,S Ali, AU - Chew,Ginger L, AU - Perzanowski,Matthew S, AU - Hoepner,Lori, AU - Garfinkel,Robin, AU - Mellins,Robert B, PY - 2008/5/1/pubmed PY - 2008/5/8/medline PY - 2008/5/1/entrez SP - 301 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma JO - J Asthma VL - 45 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in neonates have been found to predict wheeze among young children. We hypothesized that among preschool children from low-income minority communities in New York City, current asthma would be associated with a history of respiratory infection in the first few months after their birth. METHODS: We asked parents of children in New York City Head Start centers (preschool programs for children of low-income families) to respond to a questionnaire covering demographic factors, lifestyle, home environment, and health history, including a detailed history of respiratory conditions. We used logistic regression to model the association of asthma and asthma severity with history of respiratory infections, controlling for gender, ethnicity, family history of asthma, and other factors. RESULTS: Among 1,022 children (mean age 4+/- 0.6 years) whose parents provided information about their health history, 359 (35%) met our criteria for asthma. Overall, 22% had had a cold by 6 months and 17% an ear infection by 8 months of age. In multivariable models, children with asthma had had more colds (OR = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-6.0) and ear infections (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.7-6.9) in the past year than other children. Associations of respiratory infections with emergency department use for asthma (as a measure of severity) were similar. In models that did not control for infections in the past year, ages at first cold and first ear infection were associated with asthma and emergency department visits in the past year. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of preschool children, respiratory infections were common and were associated with asthma and health care utilization for asthma exacerbations. If these findings are confirmed, preventive measures among children who develop such infections at a very early age should be explored to help reduce the burden of asthma in this age group. SN - 1532-4303 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18446594/Early_respiratory_infections_and_asthma_among_New_York_City_Head_Start_children_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02770900801911186 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -