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Emerging aspects of rabies infection: with a special emphasis on children.
Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2008 Jun; 21(3):251-7.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Increased awareness of the long-neglected rabies virus could promote the highly effective methods of preventing human deaths. Rabies and rabies-related lyssaviruses have recently been appearing in unexpected places, sometimes with dire consequences. Although rabies of canine origin remains 100% fatal in human beings, should the surprising recovery of a single unvaccinated child influence treatment now?

RECENT FINDINGS

Evidence of rabies-related lyssavirus infection of bats is increasing across continents and with new virus types. Human rabies has been misdiagnosed as cerebral malaria, or even drug abuse. Organ transplant recipients have been infected. The first unvaccinated patient, a teenager, bitten by a bat, recovered from rabies encephalitis, but why might this be? Highly effective control and prevention of infection is possible. Preexposure prophylaxis for schoolchildren could now become routine. Improved economical intradermal postexposure vaccine regimens could increase the availability of affordable treatment in developing countries. Controlling dog rabies could prevent 95% of human deaths, but education and resources are lacking.

SUMMARY

The risks and problems of rabies and other lyssaviruses vary greatly across the world. Knowledge of epidemiology and prevention could save the lives of victims of animal bites and promote efforts to control and even eliminate dog rabies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oxford Vaccine Group, University of Oxford, Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK. mary.warrell@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18448969

Citation

Warrell, Mary J.. "Emerging Aspects of Rabies Infection: With a Special Emphasis On Children." Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, vol. 21, no. 3, 2008, pp. 251-7.
Warrell MJ. Emerging aspects of rabies infection: with a special emphasis on children. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2008;21(3):251-7.
Warrell, M. J. (2008). Emerging aspects of rabies infection: with a special emphasis on children. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 21(3), 251-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0b013e3282fc705b
Warrell MJ. Emerging Aspects of Rabies Infection: With a Special Emphasis On Children. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2008;21(3):251-7. PubMed PMID: 18448969.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emerging aspects of rabies infection: with a special emphasis on children. A1 - Warrell,Mary J, PY - 2008/5/2/pubmed PY - 2008/11/13/medline PY - 2008/5/2/entrez SP - 251 EP - 7 JF - Current opinion in infectious diseases JO - Curr Opin Infect Dis VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Increased awareness of the long-neglected rabies virus could promote the highly effective methods of preventing human deaths. Rabies and rabies-related lyssaviruses have recently been appearing in unexpected places, sometimes with dire consequences. Although rabies of canine origin remains 100% fatal in human beings, should the surprising recovery of a single unvaccinated child influence treatment now? RECENT FINDINGS: Evidence of rabies-related lyssavirus infection of bats is increasing across continents and with new virus types. Human rabies has been misdiagnosed as cerebral malaria, or even drug abuse. Organ transplant recipients have been infected. The first unvaccinated patient, a teenager, bitten by a bat, recovered from rabies encephalitis, but why might this be? Highly effective control and prevention of infection is possible. Preexposure prophylaxis for schoolchildren could now become routine. Improved economical intradermal postexposure vaccine regimens could increase the availability of affordable treatment in developing countries. Controlling dog rabies could prevent 95% of human deaths, but education and resources are lacking. SUMMARY: The risks and problems of rabies and other lyssaviruses vary greatly across the world. Knowledge of epidemiology and prevention could save the lives of victims of animal bites and promote efforts to control and even eliminate dog rabies. SN - 0951-7375 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18448969/Emerging_aspects_of_rabies_infection:_with_a_special_emphasis_on_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0b013e3282fc705b DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -