Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and oral and pharyngeal cancer mortality in Japan.
Oral Dis. 2008 May; 14(4):314-9.OD

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To prospectively examine the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking with oral and pharyngeal carcinogenesis, we analyzed data from a nation-wide large-scale cohort study in Japan.

METHODS

A total of 34 136 men and 43 711 women aged 40-79 years were included in the study. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of oral and pharyngeal cancer for smoking and drinking by sex, while adjusting for age, consumption of green tea, preference for salty foods, and consumption of green yellow vegetables.

RESULTS

Current smokers were found to have a higher risk of death caused by oral and pharyngeal cancer compared with non-smokers in both sexes: the RR was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.0-6.7) in men and 8.2 (95% CI: 2.1-32.1) in women. Men who drank more than 46 g ethanol per day had an approximately threefold increased risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer. Simultaneous exposure to both factors was significantly associated with an elevated risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer (RR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.1-9.6).

CONCLUSIONS

The result supports the carcinogenic effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking on the oral cavity and pharynx.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyusyu, Japan. r-ochide@med.uoeh-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18449960

Citation

Ide, R, et al. "Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, and Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Mortality in Japan." Oral Diseases, vol. 14, no. 4, 2008, pp. 314-9.
Ide R, Mizoue T, Fujino Y, et al. Cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and oral and pharyngeal cancer mortality in Japan. Oral Dis. 2008;14(4):314-9.
Ide, R., Mizoue, T., Fujino, Y., Hoshiyama, Y., Sakata, K., Tamakoshi, A., & Yoshimura, T. (2008). Cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and oral and pharyngeal cancer mortality in Japan. Oral Diseases, 14(4), 314-9.
Ide R, et al. Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, and Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Mortality in Japan. Oral Dis. 2008;14(4):314-9. PubMed PMID: 18449960.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and oral and pharyngeal cancer mortality in Japan. AU - Ide,R, AU - Mizoue,T, AU - Fujino,Y, AU - Hoshiyama,Y, AU - Sakata,K, AU - Tamakoshi,A, AU - Yoshimura,T, AU - ,, PY - 2008/5/2/pubmed PY - 2008/6/24/medline PY - 2008/5/2/entrez SP - 314 EP - 9 JF - Oral diseases JO - Oral Dis VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To prospectively examine the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking with oral and pharyngeal carcinogenesis, we analyzed data from a nation-wide large-scale cohort study in Japan. METHODS: A total of 34 136 men and 43 711 women aged 40-79 years were included in the study. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of oral and pharyngeal cancer for smoking and drinking by sex, while adjusting for age, consumption of green tea, preference for salty foods, and consumption of green yellow vegetables. RESULTS: Current smokers were found to have a higher risk of death caused by oral and pharyngeal cancer compared with non-smokers in both sexes: the RR was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.0-6.7) in men and 8.2 (95% CI: 2.1-32.1) in women. Men who drank more than 46 g ethanol per day had an approximately threefold increased risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer. Simultaneous exposure to both factors was significantly associated with an elevated risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer (RR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.1-9.6). CONCLUSIONS: The result supports the carcinogenic effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking on the oral cavity and pharynx. SN - 1601-0825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18449960/Cigarette_smoking_alcohol_drinking_and_oral_and_pharyngeal_cancer_mortality_in_Japan_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01378.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -