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Smoking exposure and allergic sensitization in children according to maternal allergies.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2008; 100(4):351-7AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the negative impact of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on airway diseases in children is well known, the effect of ETS on allergic sensitization is still debated.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate how maternal allergies modulate the effect of tobacco exposure on allergic sensitization in childhood.

METHODS

Of 9000 children in grades 4 and 5 selected in 6 cities in France, 7798 participated in a survey that consisted of an epidemiologic questionnaire, skin prick testing to common allergens, and skin examination for eczema. Tobacco exposure was obtained from parent questionnaires.

RESULTS

Twenty-five percent of the children had allergic sensitization, 25.2% had eczema, 11.6% had allergic rhinitis, 9.9% had asthma, and 8.3% had exercise-induced asthma. Twenty percent of the children were exposed to tobacco in utero. Maternal exposure had a greater impact than paternal exposure on children's allergic sensitization. Prenatal exposure was more associated with sensitization than postnatal exposure. Children with maternal allergies and exposure to maternal ETS during pregnancy were at higher risk for sensitization to house dust mite (25.7% vs. 14.0%; odds ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.18; P = .006). In contrast, sensitization to food allergens was not associated with tobacco exposure.

CONCLUSIONS

Children exposed to maternal smoking had a higher risk of sensitization to house dust mite, especially when the mothers were allergic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Respiratory Diseases Department, Hôpital du Haut-Lévèque, Bordeaux, France. chantal.raherison@chu-bordeaux.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18450121

Citation

Raherison, Chantal, et al. "Smoking Exposure and Allergic Sensitization in Children According to Maternal Allergies." Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, vol. 100, no. 4, 2008, pp. 351-7.
Raherison C, Pénard-Morand C, Moreau D, et al. Smoking exposure and allergic sensitization in children according to maternal allergies. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008;100(4):351-7.
Raherison, C., Pénard-Morand, C., Moreau, D., Caillaud, D., Charpin, D., Kopferschmitt, C., ... Maesano, I. A. (2008). Smoking exposure and allergic sensitization in children according to maternal allergies. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, 100(4), pp. 351-7. doi:10.1016/S1081-1206(10)60598-4.
Raherison C, et al. Smoking Exposure and Allergic Sensitization in Children According to Maternal Allergies. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008;100(4):351-7. PubMed PMID: 18450121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking exposure and allergic sensitization in children according to maternal allergies. AU - Raherison,Chantal, AU - Pénard-Morand,Céline, AU - Moreau,David, AU - Caillaud,Denis, AU - Charpin,Denis, AU - Kopferschmitt,Christine, AU - Lavaud,François, AU - Taytard,André, AU - Maesano,Isabella Annesi, PY - 2008/5/3/pubmed PY - 2008/5/21/medline PY - 2008/5/3/entrez SP - 351 EP - 7 JF - Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology JO - Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol. VL - 100 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although the negative impact of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on airway diseases in children is well known, the effect of ETS on allergic sensitization is still debated. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how maternal allergies modulate the effect of tobacco exposure on allergic sensitization in childhood. METHODS: Of 9000 children in grades 4 and 5 selected in 6 cities in France, 7798 participated in a survey that consisted of an epidemiologic questionnaire, skin prick testing to common allergens, and skin examination for eczema. Tobacco exposure was obtained from parent questionnaires. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of the children had allergic sensitization, 25.2% had eczema, 11.6% had allergic rhinitis, 9.9% had asthma, and 8.3% had exercise-induced asthma. Twenty percent of the children were exposed to tobacco in utero. Maternal exposure had a greater impact than paternal exposure on children's allergic sensitization. Prenatal exposure was more associated with sensitization than postnatal exposure. Children with maternal allergies and exposure to maternal ETS during pregnancy were at higher risk for sensitization to house dust mite (25.7% vs. 14.0%; odds ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.18; P = .006). In contrast, sensitization to food allergens was not associated with tobacco exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Children exposed to maternal smoking had a higher risk of sensitization to house dust mite, especially when the mothers were allergic. SN - 1081-1206 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18450121/Smoking_exposure_and_allergic_sensitization_in_children_according_to_maternal_allergies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1081-1206(10)60598-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -