Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

One snake or two: the symbols of medicine.
Am Surg. 2008 Apr; 74(4):330-4.AS

Abstract

In antiquity, Asklepios was portrayed with a stout staff around which was coiled a snake. Hermes (Mercury), the messenger of the gods, was portrayed with a wand, often with wings, around which were coiled two snakes. During the Renaissance and up to modern times, in varied locales, each icon has been termed the caduceus and afforded the status of the symbol of medicine. It is proposed that this confusion did not arise from ignorance, but from the loss of the deeper significance of the symbols, and from the replacement of religious iconographic constraints by aesthetic and decorative considerations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Surgical Anatomy, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. cfroman@emory.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18453299

Citation

Froman, Carol R., and John E. Skandalakis. "One Snake or Two: the Symbols of Medicine." The American Surgeon, vol. 74, no. 4, 2008, pp. 330-4.
Froman CR, Skandalakis JE. One snake or two: the symbols of medicine. Am Surg. 2008;74(4):330-4.
Froman, C. R., & Skandalakis, J. E. (2008). One snake or two: the symbols of medicine. The American Surgeon, 74(4), 330-4.
Froman CR, Skandalakis JE. One Snake or Two: the Symbols of Medicine. Am Surg. 2008;74(4):330-4. PubMed PMID: 18453299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - One snake or two: the symbols of medicine. AU - Froman,Carol R, AU - Skandalakis,John E, PY - 2008/5/6/pubmed PY - 2008/6/5/medline PY - 2008/5/6/entrez SP - 330 EP - 4 JF - The American surgeon JO - Am Surg VL - 74 IS - 4 N2 - In antiquity, Asklepios was portrayed with a stout staff around which was coiled a snake. Hermes (Mercury), the messenger of the gods, was portrayed with a wand, often with wings, around which were coiled two snakes. During the Renaissance and up to modern times, in varied locales, each icon has been termed the caduceus and afforded the status of the symbol of medicine. It is proposed that this confusion did not arise from ignorance, but from the loss of the deeper significance of the symbols, and from the replacement of religious iconographic constraints by aesthetic and decorative considerations. SN - 0003-1348 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18453299/One_snake_or_two:_the_symbols_of_medicine_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -