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Health status and access to health care of migrant workers in China.
Public Health Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr; 123(2):189-97.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We explored living and working conditions, health status, and health-care access in Chinese rural-to-urban migrants and compared them with permanent rural and urban residents.

METHODS

A questionnaire was administered to 1,958 urban workers, 1,909 rural workers, and 4,452 migrant workers in Zhejiang Province, Eastern China, in 2004. Blood samples for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis were taken from the migrant and urban workers.

RESULTS

Migrants were young, worked very long hours, and their living conditions were very basic. Nineteen percent had some form of health insurance and 26% were entitled to limited sick pay compared with 68% and 66%, respectively, for urban workers. Migrants had the best self-rated health and reported the least acute illness, chronic disease, and disability, after controlling for age and education. There were no HIV infections detected in either the migrant or urban workers. However, 15 urban workers (0.68%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35, 1.02) and 20 migrants (0.48%, 95% CI 0.26, 0.66, p=0.06) tested positive for syphilis. The high cost of health care in the city was a barrier to health-care access in the last year for 15% of the migrants and 8% of the urban workers. Forty-seven percent of the migrants were unwilling to make contributions to health insurance.

CONCLUSIONS

These migrants demonstrated the "healthy migrant effect." However, poor living conditions and inattention to health may make migrants vulnerable to poor long-term health. Because health insurance schemes will remain limited for the forseeable future, attention should focus on providing affordable health care to both uninsured migrants and the urban poor.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University College London Centre for International Health and Development, London, England. t.hesketh@ich.ucl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18457071

Citation

Hesketh, Therese, et al. "Health Status and Access to Health Care of Migrant Workers in China." Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974), vol. 123, no. 2, 2008, pp. 189-97.
Hesketh T, Ye XJ, Li L, et al. Health status and access to health care of migrant workers in China. Public Health Rep. 2008;123(2):189-97.
Hesketh, T., Ye, X. J., Li, L., & Wang, H. M. (2008). Health status and access to health care of migrant workers in China. Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974), 123(2), 189-97.
Hesketh T, et al. Health Status and Access to Health Care of Migrant Workers in China. Public Health Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;123(2):189-97. PubMed PMID: 18457071.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health status and access to health care of migrant workers in China. AU - Hesketh,Therese, AU - Ye,Xue Jun, AU - Li,Lu, AU - Wang,Hong Mei, PY - 2008/5/7/pubmed PY - 2008/5/23/medline PY - 2008/5/7/entrez SP - 189 EP - 97 JF - Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974) JO - Public Health Rep VL - 123 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We explored living and working conditions, health status, and health-care access in Chinese rural-to-urban migrants and compared them with permanent rural and urban residents. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to 1,958 urban workers, 1,909 rural workers, and 4,452 migrant workers in Zhejiang Province, Eastern China, in 2004. Blood samples for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis were taken from the migrant and urban workers. RESULTS: Migrants were young, worked very long hours, and their living conditions were very basic. Nineteen percent had some form of health insurance and 26% were entitled to limited sick pay compared with 68% and 66%, respectively, for urban workers. Migrants had the best self-rated health and reported the least acute illness, chronic disease, and disability, after controlling for age and education. There were no HIV infections detected in either the migrant or urban workers. However, 15 urban workers (0.68%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35, 1.02) and 20 migrants (0.48%, 95% CI 0.26, 0.66, p=0.06) tested positive for syphilis. The high cost of health care in the city was a barrier to health-care access in the last year for 15% of the migrants and 8% of the urban workers. Forty-seven percent of the migrants were unwilling to make contributions to health insurance. CONCLUSIONS: These migrants demonstrated the "healthy migrant effect." However, poor living conditions and inattention to health may make migrants vulnerable to poor long-term health. Because health insurance schemes will remain limited for the forseeable future, attention should focus on providing affordable health care to both uninsured migrants and the urban poor. SN - 0033-3549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18457071/Health_status_and_access_to_health_care_of_migrant_workers_in_China_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/003335490812300211?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -