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Unemployment among women: examining the relationship of physical and psychological intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder.
J Interpers Violence. 2009 Mar; 24(3):450-63.JI

Abstract

Prior research has demonstrated that intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with employment instability among poor women. The current study assesses the broader relationship between IPV and women's workforce participation in a population-based sample of 6,698 California women. We examined past-year IPV by analyzing specific effects of physical violence, psychological violence, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as predictors of unemployment. Results indicated substantial rates of unemployment among women who reported IPV, with rates of 20% among women who experienced psychological violence, 18% among women who experienced physical violence, and 19% among women with PTSD symptoms. When the relationship was adjusted for demographic characteristics and educational attainment, PTSD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22, 2.09) and psychological violence (AOR = 1.78; 95% CI = 1.36, 2.32), but not physical violence, were associated with unemployment. Implications for supported employment programs and workplace responses to IPV are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VA Palo Alto Health Care System, National Center for PTSD (PTSD-334), 795 Willow Road, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, CA 94025, USA. Rachel.Kimerling@va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18458353

Citation

Kimerling, Rachel, et al. "Unemployment Among Women: Examining the Relationship of Physical and Psychological Intimate Partner Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder." Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 24, no. 3, 2009, pp. 450-63.
Kimerling R, Alvarez J, Pavao J, et al. Unemployment among women: examining the relationship of physical and psychological intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder. J Interpers Violence. 2009;24(3):450-63.
Kimerling, R., Alvarez, J., Pavao, J., Mack, K. P., Smith, M. W., & Baumrind, N. (2009). Unemployment among women: examining the relationship of physical and psychological intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 24(3), 450-63. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260508317191
Kimerling R, et al. Unemployment Among Women: Examining the Relationship of Physical and Psychological Intimate Partner Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. J Interpers Violence. 2009;24(3):450-63. PubMed PMID: 18458353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unemployment among women: examining the relationship of physical and psychological intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder. AU - Kimerling,Rachel, AU - Alvarez,Jennifer, AU - Pavao,Joanne, AU - Mack,Katelyn P, AU - Smith,Mark W, AU - Baumrind,Nikki, Y1 - 2008/05/05/ PY - 2008/5/7/pubmed PY - 2009/5/8/medline PY - 2008/5/7/entrez SP - 450 EP - 63 JF - Journal of interpersonal violence JO - J Interpers Violence VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - Prior research has demonstrated that intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with employment instability among poor women. The current study assesses the broader relationship between IPV and women's workforce participation in a population-based sample of 6,698 California women. We examined past-year IPV by analyzing specific effects of physical violence, psychological violence, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as predictors of unemployment. Results indicated substantial rates of unemployment among women who reported IPV, with rates of 20% among women who experienced psychological violence, 18% among women who experienced physical violence, and 19% among women with PTSD symptoms. When the relationship was adjusted for demographic characteristics and educational attainment, PTSD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22, 2.09) and psychological violence (AOR = 1.78; 95% CI = 1.36, 2.32), but not physical violence, were associated with unemployment. Implications for supported employment programs and workplace responses to IPV are discussed. SN - 0886-2605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18458353/Unemployment_among_women:_examining_the_relationship_of_physical_and_psychological_intimate_partner_violence_and_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0886260508317191?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -