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The epidemiology of pregnancy-associated emergency department injury visits and their impact on birth outcomes.
Accid Anal Prev. 2008 May; 40(3):1088-95.AA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Describe the demographics, injury types, mechanisms, and intents of emergency department (ED) injury visits by pregnant women and to quantify their risk of adverse birth outcomes.

METHODS

Through a retrospective cohort study design, Utah ED, birth, and fetal death records were probabilistically linked to identify women seen in an ED with an injury during pregnancy among births and fetal deaths from 1999 to 2002. Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of having an injury-related ED visit on various adverse pregnancy outcomes.

RESULTS

7350 (3.9%) women experienced an injury-related ED visit during pregnancy. Motor vehicle occupant injuries were the leading mechanism of ED injury visits (22.4%). Controlling for known risks, pregnant women with an injury-related ED visit were more likely than non-injured pregnant women to experience preterm labor (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.12-1.34), placental abruption (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.08-1.65), and cesarean delivery (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.19-1.36). Infants born to women who were injured during pregnancy were more likely to be born preterm (OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.12-1.34) and have low birth weight (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.1-1.35).

CONCLUSIONS

Most injured pregnant women are treated and released from the ED; however, significant increased risks remain for several maternal complications and birth outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pittsburgh, Department of Neurological Surgery, Center for Injury Research and Control, PARKV 203, 3520 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. weisshb@upmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18460377

Citation

Weiss, Harold B., et al. "The Epidemiology of Pregnancy-associated Emergency Department Injury Visits and Their Impact On Birth Outcomes." Accident; Analysis and Prevention, vol. 40, no. 3, 2008, pp. 1088-95.
Weiss HB, Sauber-Schatz EK, Cook LJ. The epidemiology of pregnancy-associated emergency department injury visits and their impact on birth outcomes. Accid Anal Prev. 2008;40(3):1088-95.
Weiss, H. B., Sauber-Schatz, E. K., & Cook, L. J. (2008). The epidemiology of pregnancy-associated emergency department injury visits and their impact on birth outcomes. Accident; Analysis and Prevention, 40(3), 1088-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2007.11.011
Weiss HB, Sauber-Schatz EK, Cook LJ. The Epidemiology of Pregnancy-associated Emergency Department Injury Visits and Their Impact On Birth Outcomes. Accid Anal Prev. 2008;40(3):1088-95. PubMed PMID: 18460377.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The epidemiology of pregnancy-associated emergency department injury visits and their impact on birth outcomes. AU - Weiss,Harold B, AU - Sauber-Schatz,Erin K, AU - Cook,Lawrence J, Y1 - 2007/12/26/ PY - 2007/08/03/received PY - 2007/10/19/revised PY - 2007/11/30/accepted PY - 2008/5/8/pubmed PY - 2008/9/27/medline PY - 2008/5/8/entrez SP - 1088 EP - 95 JF - Accident; analysis and prevention JO - Accid Anal Prev VL - 40 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Describe the demographics, injury types, mechanisms, and intents of emergency department (ED) injury visits by pregnant women and to quantify their risk of adverse birth outcomes. METHODS: Through a retrospective cohort study design, Utah ED, birth, and fetal death records were probabilistically linked to identify women seen in an ED with an injury during pregnancy among births and fetal deaths from 1999 to 2002. Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of having an injury-related ED visit on various adverse pregnancy outcomes. RESULTS: 7350 (3.9%) women experienced an injury-related ED visit during pregnancy. Motor vehicle occupant injuries were the leading mechanism of ED injury visits (22.4%). Controlling for known risks, pregnant women with an injury-related ED visit were more likely than non-injured pregnant women to experience preterm labor (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.12-1.34), placental abruption (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.08-1.65), and cesarean delivery (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.19-1.36). Infants born to women who were injured during pregnancy were more likely to be born preterm (OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.12-1.34) and have low birth weight (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.1-1.35). CONCLUSIONS: Most injured pregnant women are treated and released from the ED; however, significant increased risks remain for several maternal complications and birth outcomes. SN - 0001-4575 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18460377/The_epidemiology_of_pregnancy_associated_emergency_department_injury_visits_and_their_impact_on_birth_outcomes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001-4575(07)00212-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -