Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cyanobacterial toxin removal in drinking water treatment processes and recreational waters.
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008; 619:275-90.AE

Abstract

Although federal drinking water regulations determine the quality of potable water, many specifics influence how each utility chooses to treatment water. Some of the specifics include source water quality, storage capacity, existing unit process, and space. An overview of the US recreational and drinking water regulations were discussed in context of cyanobacterial toxin removal and inactivation by ancillary as well as auxiliary treatment practices. Ancillary practice refers to the removal or inactivation of algal toxins by standard daily operational procedures where auxiliary treatment practice refers to intentional treatment. An example of auxiliary treatment would be the addition of powder activated carbon to remove taste and odor compounds. The implementation of new technologies as such ultraviolet disinfection and membrane filtration, to meet current and purposed regulations, can greatly affect the algal toxin removal and inactivation efficiencies. A discussion on meeting the current regulations by altering chemical disinfection, ozone, chlorine, chloramines and chlorine dioxide included their ancillary effects on the protection against algal toxins. Although much of the research has been on the efficiency of the removal and inactivation of microcystin LR and several microcystin variants, the discussion included other algal toxins: anatoxin-a, saxitoxins, and cyclindrospermopsin.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lake Superior State University, USA. jwestrick@lssu.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18461774

Citation

Westrick, Judy A.. "Cyanobacterial Toxin Removal in Drinking Water Treatment Processes and Recreational Waters." Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 619, 2008, pp. 275-90.
Westrick JA. Cyanobacterial toxin removal in drinking water treatment processes and recreational waters. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008;619:275-90.
Westrick, J. A. (2008). Cyanobacterial toxin removal in drinking water treatment processes and recreational waters. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 619, 275-90. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-75865-7_13
Westrick JA. Cyanobacterial Toxin Removal in Drinking Water Treatment Processes and Recreational Waters. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008;619:275-90. PubMed PMID: 18461774.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cyanobacterial toxin removal in drinking water treatment processes and recreational waters. A1 - Westrick,Judy A, PY - 2008/5/9/pubmed PY - 2008/6/19/medline PY - 2008/5/9/entrez SP - 275 EP - 90 JF - Advances in experimental medicine and biology JO - Adv Exp Med Biol VL - 619 N2 - Although federal drinking water regulations determine the quality of potable water, many specifics influence how each utility chooses to treatment water. Some of the specifics include source water quality, storage capacity, existing unit process, and space. An overview of the US recreational and drinking water regulations were discussed in context of cyanobacterial toxin removal and inactivation by ancillary as well as auxiliary treatment practices. Ancillary practice refers to the removal or inactivation of algal toxins by standard daily operational procedures where auxiliary treatment practice refers to intentional treatment. An example of auxiliary treatment would be the addition of powder activated carbon to remove taste and odor compounds. The implementation of new technologies as such ultraviolet disinfection and membrane filtration, to meet current and purposed regulations, can greatly affect the algal toxin removal and inactivation efficiencies. A discussion on meeting the current regulations by altering chemical disinfection, ozone, chlorine, chloramines and chlorine dioxide included their ancillary effects on the protection against algal toxins. Although much of the research has been on the efficiency of the removal and inactivation of microcystin LR and several microcystin variants, the discussion included other algal toxins: anatoxin-a, saxitoxins, and cyclindrospermopsin. SN - 0065-2598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18461774/Cyanobacterial_toxin_removal_in_drinking_water_treatment_processes_and_recreational_waters_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-75865-7_13 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -