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Vitamin C intake and serum uric acid concentration in men.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined associations between vitamin C intake and serum uric acid in men in a population-based study.

METHODS

We included 1387 men without hypertension and with body mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m(2) in the Health Professional Follow-up Study. Dietary intake was assessed with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire validated for use in this population. Serum uric acid concentrations were measured.

RESULTS

Greater intakes of total vitamin C were significantly associated with lower serum uric acid concentrations, after adjustment for smoking, BMI, ethnicity, blood pressure, presence of gout, use of aspirin, and intake of energy, alcohol, dairy protein, fructose, meat, seafood and coffee. An inverse dose-response association was observed through vitamin C intake of 400-500 mg/day, and then reached a plateau. Adjusted mean uric acid concentrations across total vitamin C intake categories (< 90, 90-249, 250-499, 500-999, or > or = 1000 mg/day) were 6.4, 6.1, 6.0, 5.7, and 5.7 mg/dl, respectively (p for trend < 0.001). Greater vitamin C intake was associated with lower prevalence of hyperuricemia (serum uric acid > 6 mg/dl). Multivariate odds ratios for hyperuricemia across total vitamin C intake categories were 1 (reference), 0.58, 0.57, 0.38, and 0.34 (95% CI 0.20-0.58; P for trend < 0.001). When we used dietary data, which were assessed 4-8 years before blood collection, as predictors, we observed similar inverse associations between vitamin C intake and uric acid.

CONCLUSION

These population-based data indicate that vitamin C intake in men is inversely associated with serum uric acid concentrations. These findings support a potential role of vitamin C in the prevention of hyperuricemia and gout.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. xgao@hsph.harvard.edu

    , , ,

    Source

    The Journal of rheumatology 35:9 2008 Sep pg 1853-8

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Diet Surveys
    Feeding Behavior
    Gout
    Humans
    Hyperuricemia
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States
    Uric Acid

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18464304

    Citation

    Gao, Xiang, et al. "Vitamin C Intake and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in Men." The Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 35, no. 9, 2008, pp. 1853-8.
    Gao X, Curhan G, Forman JP, et al. Vitamin C intake and serum uric acid concentration in men. J Rheumatol. 2008;35(9):1853-8.
    Gao, X., Curhan, G., Forman, J. P., Ascherio, A., & Choi, H. K. (2008). Vitamin C intake and serum uric acid concentration in men. The Journal of Rheumatology, 35(9), pp. 1853-8.
    Gao X, et al. Vitamin C Intake and Serum Uric Acid Concentration in Men. J Rheumatol. 2008;35(9):1853-8. PubMed PMID: 18464304.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C intake and serum uric acid concentration in men. AU - Gao,Xiang, AU - Curhan,Gary, AU - Forman,John P, AU - Ascherio,Alberto, AU - Choi,Hyon K, Y1 - 2008/05/01/ PY - 2008/5/9/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/5/9/entrez SP - 1853 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of rheumatology JO - J. Rheumatol. VL - 35 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between vitamin C intake and serum uric acid in men in a population-based study. METHODS: We included 1387 men without hypertension and with body mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m(2) in the Health Professional Follow-up Study. Dietary intake was assessed with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire validated for use in this population. Serum uric acid concentrations were measured. RESULTS: Greater intakes of total vitamin C were significantly associated with lower serum uric acid concentrations, after adjustment for smoking, BMI, ethnicity, blood pressure, presence of gout, use of aspirin, and intake of energy, alcohol, dairy protein, fructose, meat, seafood and coffee. An inverse dose-response association was observed through vitamin C intake of 400-500 mg/day, and then reached a plateau. Adjusted mean uric acid concentrations across total vitamin C intake categories (< 90, 90-249, 250-499, 500-999, or > or = 1000 mg/day) were 6.4, 6.1, 6.0, 5.7, and 5.7 mg/dl, respectively (p for trend < 0.001). Greater vitamin C intake was associated with lower prevalence of hyperuricemia (serum uric acid > 6 mg/dl). Multivariate odds ratios for hyperuricemia across total vitamin C intake categories were 1 (reference), 0.58, 0.57, 0.38, and 0.34 (95% CI 0.20-0.58; P for trend < 0.001). When we used dietary data, which were assessed 4-8 years before blood collection, as predictors, we observed similar inverse associations between vitamin C intake and uric acid. CONCLUSION: These population-based data indicate that vitamin C intake in men is inversely associated with serum uric acid concentrations. These findings support a potential role of vitamin C in the prevention of hyperuricemia and gout. SN - 0315-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18464304/Vitamin_C_intake_and_serum_uric_acid_concentration_in_men_ L2 - http://www.jrheum.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18464304 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -