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Relationships between cognitive deficits, symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia.
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2008 Jun; 42(6):496-504.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Schizophrenia is a complex disorder characterized by impairment in a number of domains, all of which contribute to disability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between cognitive function, symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in schizophrenia.

METHOD

This cross-sectional study measured cognition, positive and negative symptom severity, and quality of life (measured with the Quality of Life Scale) in 57 outpatients with schizophrenia. Correlations between the different measures were sought. Multiple regression analyses were used to develop models of the contributions of cognitive deficits and symptomatology to QOL.

RESULTS

More severe positive and negative symptoms and cognitive impairment each correlated with poorer QOL. There was a moderate association between negative symptoms and cognition and a small association between positive symptoms and cognition. Age, gender, and drug and alcohol abuse did not significantly predict QOL. In the multiple regression analysis, entering the total cognition and total symptom scores produced a model that accounted for an additional 57% of the variance in QOL.

CONCLUSIONS

Improving quality of life for people with schizophrenia requires that positive and negative symptoms and cognition are each addressed as separate domains of impairment. But, given that these account for only 57% of the variance in QOL, other factors such as unemployment, poverty, social isolation and stigma may also be important.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Country Psychology Services, Families SA, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18465376

Citation

Savilla, Kara, et al. "Relationships Between Cognitive Deficits, Symptoms and Quality of Life in Schizophrenia." The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 42, no. 6, 2008, pp. 496-504.
Savilla K, Kettler L, Galletly C. Relationships between cognitive deficits, symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2008;42(6):496-504.
Savilla, K., Kettler, L., & Galletly, C. (2008). Relationships between cognitive deficits, symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 42(6), 496-504. https://doi.org/10.1080/00048670802050512
Savilla K, Kettler L, Galletly C. Relationships Between Cognitive Deficits, Symptoms and Quality of Life in Schizophrenia. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2008;42(6):496-504. PubMed PMID: 18465376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships between cognitive deficits, symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia. AU - Savilla,Kara, AU - Kettler,Lisa, AU - Galletly,Cherrie, PY - 2008/5/10/pubmed PY - 2008/8/22/medline PY - 2008/5/10/entrez SP - 496 EP - 504 JF - The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry JO - Aust N Z J Psychiatry VL - 42 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is a complex disorder characterized by impairment in a number of domains, all of which contribute to disability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between cognitive function, symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in schizophrenia. METHOD: This cross-sectional study measured cognition, positive and negative symptom severity, and quality of life (measured with the Quality of Life Scale) in 57 outpatients with schizophrenia. Correlations between the different measures were sought. Multiple regression analyses were used to develop models of the contributions of cognitive deficits and symptomatology to QOL. RESULTS: More severe positive and negative symptoms and cognitive impairment each correlated with poorer QOL. There was a moderate association between negative symptoms and cognition and a small association between positive symptoms and cognition. Age, gender, and drug and alcohol abuse did not significantly predict QOL. In the multiple regression analysis, entering the total cognition and total symptom scores produced a model that accounted for an additional 57% of the variance in QOL. CONCLUSIONS: Improving quality of life for people with schizophrenia requires that positive and negative symptoms and cognition are each addressed as separate domains of impairment. But, given that these account for only 57% of the variance in QOL, other factors such as unemployment, poverty, social isolation and stigma may also be important. SN - 1440-1614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18465376/Relationships_between_cognitive_deficits_symptoms_and_quality_of_life_in_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1080/00048670802050512?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -