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Overweight and obese prevalence rates in African American and Hispanic children: an analysis of data from the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health.
J Am Board Fam Med 2008 May-Jun; 21(3):191-9JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of overweight and obesity was examined in African-American and Hispanic children compared with white children.

METHODS

Multivariate analyses were performed on cross-sectional data from the National Survey of Children's Health collected in 2003 to 2004.

RESULTS

Analyses found that overweight children were more likely to be African American and Hispanic than white, be male, live in households with incomes below 150% of the Federal poverty level, watch television 3 or more hours daily, and not have received preventive care in the past 12 months. Overweight children were less likely to get minimum levels of moderate physical activity or have participated on a sports team.

CONCLUSIONS

Poverty impacts childhood body mass index in at least 2 specific ways: unsafe neighborhoods and the cost and accessibility of healthy foods in low income communities. Addressing these issues require the concerted efforts of policy makers. The same is true for resolving the issues of children not receiving preventive care. Increasing the number of well child check-ups mandated by the government and required by school systems may be a beneficial policy. Furthermore, policymakers concerned with issues of childhood obesity may pursue the creation of school-based health clinics in schools where at least 50% of the student body live in households with incomes <150% of the Federal poverty level.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, Illinois 61107, USA. lutfiyyah@uic.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18467530

Citation

Lutfiyya, May Nawal, et al. "Overweight and Obese Prevalence Rates in African American and Hispanic Children: an Analysis of Data From the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health." Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM, vol. 21, no. 3, 2008, pp. 191-9.
Lutfiyya MN, Garcia R, Dankwa CM, et al. Overweight and obese prevalence rates in African American and Hispanic children: an analysis of data from the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health. J Am Board Fam Med. 2008;21(3):191-9.
Lutfiyya, M. N., Garcia, R., Dankwa, C. M., Young, T., & Lipsky, M. S. (2008). Overweight and obese prevalence rates in African American and Hispanic children: an analysis of data from the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM, 21(3), pp. 191-9. doi:10.3122/jabfm.2008.03.070207.
Lutfiyya MN, et al. Overweight and Obese Prevalence Rates in African American and Hispanic Children: an Analysis of Data From the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health. J Am Board Fam Med. 2008;21(3):191-9. PubMed PMID: 18467530.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overweight and obese prevalence rates in African American and Hispanic children: an analysis of data from the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health. AU - Lutfiyya,May Nawal, AU - Garcia,Rosemary, AU - Dankwa,Christine M, AU - Young,Teriya, AU - Lipsky,Martin S, PY - 2008/5/10/pubmed PY - 2008/9/20/medline PY - 2008/5/10/entrez SP - 191 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM JO - J Am Board Fam Med VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity was examined in African-American and Hispanic children compared with white children. METHODS: Multivariate analyses were performed on cross-sectional data from the National Survey of Children's Health collected in 2003 to 2004. RESULTS: Analyses found that overweight children were more likely to be African American and Hispanic than white, be male, live in households with incomes below 150% of the Federal poverty level, watch television 3 or more hours daily, and not have received preventive care in the past 12 months. Overweight children were less likely to get minimum levels of moderate physical activity or have participated on a sports team. CONCLUSIONS: Poverty impacts childhood body mass index in at least 2 specific ways: unsafe neighborhoods and the cost and accessibility of healthy foods in low income communities. Addressing these issues require the concerted efforts of policy makers. The same is true for resolving the issues of children not receiving preventive care. Increasing the number of well child check-ups mandated by the government and required by school systems may be a beneficial policy. Furthermore, policymakers concerned with issues of childhood obesity may pursue the creation of school-based health clinics in schools where at least 50% of the student body live in households with incomes <150% of the Federal poverty level. SN - 1557-2625 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18467530/Overweight_and_obese_prevalence_rates_in_African_American_and_Hispanic_children:_an_analysis_of_data_from_the_2003_2004_National_Survey_of_Children's_Health_ L2 - http://www.jabfm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18467530 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -