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Short-term and long-term outcomes of the cleft lift procedure in the management of nonacute pilonidal disorders.

Abstract

PURPOSE

We report the results of the cleft lift procedure in the management of nonacute pilonidal sinus disorders.

METHODS

Seventy consecutive patients who underwent a cleft lift for nonacute pilonidal sinus were evaluated prospectively. Responses to a postal questionnaire were analyzed for long-term outcome.

RESULTS

All patients who fulfilled the criteria for day-case were operated on as such. Sixty-six patients achieved complete wound healing within six weeks. Delayed wound healing occurred in three patients and nonhealing occurred in one. Fourteen patients had one or more complications: wound breakdown, superficial (n = 7) and deep (n = 1); wound infection (n = 5); wound seroma (n = 4); and early recurrence (n = 1). The median time off work and to return to normal activities was two and four weeks, respectively (range, 0.5-12). Forty-seven patients completed the questionnaire at a median follow-up of 24 months: five patients reported minimal tenderness in the sacral region; none reported recurrence of pilonidal symptoms; and all were satisfied.

CONCLUSIONS

The cleft lift procedure is easy to perform as a day-case procedure. It is associated with high rates of primary healing, durable low recurrence rates, and early functional recovery. This technique may be the procedure of choice in the surgical management of nonacute pilonidal disorders.

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    Source

    Diseases of the colon and rectum 51:7 2008 Jul pg 1100-6

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Chronic Disease
    Digestive System Surgical Procedures
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Patient Satisfaction
    Pilonidal Sinus
    Prospective Studies
    Questionnaires
    Surgical Flaps
    Time Factors
    Treatment Outcome
    Wound Healing

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18470564