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Evidence for cross-adaptation between s-triazine herbicides resulting in reduced efficacy under field conditions.
Pest Manag Sci. 2008 Oct; 64(10):1024-30.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Enhanced atrazine degradation has been observed in agricultural soils from around the globe. Soils exhibiting enhanced atrazine degradation may be cross-adapted with other s-triazine herbicides, thereby reducing their control of sensitive weed species. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the field persistence of simazine in atrazine-adapted and non-adapted soils, (2) to compare mineralization of ring-labeled (14)C-simazine and (14)C-atrazine between atrazine-adapted and non-adapted soils and (3) to evaluate prickly sida control with simazine in atrazine-adapted and non-adapted soils.

RESULTS

Pooled over two pre-emergent (PRE) application dates, simazine field persistence was 1.4-fold lower in atrazine-adapted than in non-adapted soils. For both simazine and atrazine, the mineralization lag phase was 4.3-fold shorter and the mineralization rate constant was 3.5-fold higher in atrazine-adapted than in non-adapted soils. Collectively, the persistence and mineralization data confirm cross-adaptation between these s-triazine herbicides. In non-adapted soils, simazine PRE at the 15 March and 17 April planting dates reduced prickly sida density at least 5.4-fold compared with the no simazine PRE treatment. Conversely, in atrazine-adapted soils, prickly sida densities were not statistically different between simazine PRE and no simazine PRE at either planting date, thereby indicating reduced simazine efficacy in atrazine-adapted soils.

CONCLUSIONS

Results demonstrate the potential for cross-adaptation among s-triazine herbicides and the subsequent reduction in the control of otherwise sensitive weed species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southern Weed Science Research Unit, PO Box 350, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA. jason.krutz@ars.usda.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18473320

Citation

Krutz, L Jason, et al. "Evidence for Cross-adaptation Between S-triazine Herbicides Resulting in Reduced Efficacy Under Field Conditions." Pest Management Science, vol. 64, no. 10, 2008, pp. 1024-30.
Krutz LJ, Burke IC, Reddy KN, et al. Evidence for cross-adaptation between s-triazine herbicides resulting in reduced efficacy under field conditions. Pest Manag Sci. 2008;64(10):1024-30.
Krutz, L. J., Burke, I. C., Reddy, K. N., & Zablotowicz, R. M. (2008). Evidence for cross-adaptation between s-triazine herbicides resulting in reduced efficacy under field conditions. Pest Management Science, 64(10), 1024-30. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.1601
Krutz LJ, et al. Evidence for Cross-adaptation Between S-triazine Herbicides Resulting in Reduced Efficacy Under Field Conditions. Pest Manag Sci. 2008;64(10):1024-30. PubMed PMID: 18473320.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence for cross-adaptation between s-triazine herbicides resulting in reduced efficacy under field conditions. AU - Krutz,L Jason, AU - Burke,Ian C, AU - Reddy,Krishna N, AU - Zablotowicz,Robert M, PY - 2008/5/14/pubmed PY - 2008/11/13/medline PY - 2008/5/14/entrez SP - 1024 EP - 30 JF - Pest management science JO - Pest Manag Sci VL - 64 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Enhanced atrazine degradation has been observed in agricultural soils from around the globe. Soils exhibiting enhanced atrazine degradation may be cross-adapted with other s-triazine herbicides, thereby reducing their control of sensitive weed species. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the field persistence of simazine in atrazine-adapted and non-adapted soils, (2) to compare mineralization of ring-labeled (14)C-simazine and (14)C-atrazine between atrazine-adapted and non-adapted soils and (3) to evaluate prickly sida control with simazine in atrazine-adapted and non-adapted soils. RESULTS: Pooled over two pre-emergent (PRE) application dates, simazine field persistence was 1.4-fold lower in atrazine-adapted than in non-adapted soils. For both simazine and atrazine, the mineralization lag phase was 4.3-fold shorter and the mineralization rate constant was 3.5-fold higher in atrazine-adapted than in non-adapted soils. Collectively, the persistence and mineralization data confirm cross-adaptation between these s-triazine herbicides. In non-adapted soils, simazine PRE at the 15 March and 17 April planting dates reduced prickly sida density at least 5.4-fold compared with the no simazine PRE treatment. Conversely, in atrazine-adapted soils, prickly sida densities were not statistically different between simazine PRE and no simazine PRE at either planting date, thereby indicating reduced simazine efficacy in atrazine-adapted soils. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrate the potential for cross-adaptation among s-triazine herbicides and the subsequent reduction in the control of otherwise sensitive weed species. SN - 1526-498X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18473320/Evidence_for_cross_adaptation_between_s_triazine_herbicides_resulting_in_reduced_efficacy_under_field_conditions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.1601 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -