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On the functional role of temporal and frontal cortex activation in passive detection of auditory deviance.
Neuroimage. 2008 Jul 15; 41(4):1462-70.N

Abstract

The superior temporal cortex (STC) and inferior frontal cortex (IFC) are active during pre-attentive change detection. According to one influential model, the temporal cortex is responsible for memory trace comparison and the frontal cortex for attention switching. However, fMRI studies that used parametric designs revealed frontal cortex activity that is inconsistent with this model. In response, alternative accounts of frontal cortex activity, such as contrast enhancement and response inhibition, have been suggested. In this study, we measured the event related potential (ERP) and event related optical signal (EROS) responses elicited by pitch deviants in a parametric design. The ERP results revealed the typical modulation of mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitude by degree of deviance. The EROS results showed a similar modulation effect in the temporal cortex and a general temporal cortex followed by frontal cortex activation pattern. Interestingly, medium deviants elicited a greater frontal EROS response than did large or small deviants. Moreover, regression analyses showed that the EROS measures, specifically the linear trend in the temporal cortex and the inverse quadratic trend in the frontal cortex, correlated with the linear trend of the ERP MMN response. Taken together, these results indicate that 1) deviance magnitude modulates the brain activity elicited by pitch stimuli in the STC and IFC within the same time range as electrophysiological measures of passive deviance detection, 2) EROS measures of deviance detection are highly correlated with the ERP MMN, and 3) the functional relationship of STC and IFC is consistent with both the contrast enhancement and response inhibition accounts of IFC activity in passive deviance detection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Beckman Institute and Department of Psychology, The University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18474433

Citation

Tse, Chun-Yu, and Trevor B. Penney. "On the Functional Role of Temporal and Frontal Cortex Activation in Passive Detection of Auditory Deviance." NeuroImage, vol. 41, no. 4, 2008, pp. 1462-70.
Tse CY, Penney TB. On the functional role of temporal and frontal cortex activation in passive detection of auditory deviance. Neuroimage. 2008;41(4):1462-70.
Tse, C. Y., & Penney, T. B. (2008). On the functional role of temporal and frontal cortex activation in passive detection of auditory deviance. NeuroImage, 41(4), 1462-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.03.043
Tse CY, Penney TB. On the Functional Role of Temporal and Frontal Cortex Activation in Passive Detection of Auditory Deviance. Neuroimage. 2008 Jul 15;41(4):1462-70. PubMed PMID: 18474433.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - On the functional role of temporal and frontal cortex activation in passive detection of auditory deviance. AU - Tse,Chun-Yu, AU - Penney,Trevor B, Y1 - 2008/04/04/ PY - 2007/11/23/received PY - 2008/03/03/revised PY - 2008/03/19/accepted PY - 2008/5/14/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/5/14/entrez SP - 1462 EP - 70 JF - NeuroImage JO - Neuroimage VL - 41 IS - 4 N2 - The superior temporal cortex (STC) and inferior frontal cortex (IFC) are active during pre-attentive change detection. According to one influential model, the temporal cortex is responsible for memory trace comparison and the frontal cortex for attention switching. However, fMRI studies that used parametric designs revealed frontal cortex activity that is inconsistent with this model. In response, alternative accounts of frontal cortex activity, such as contrast enhancement and response inhibition, have been suggested. In this study, we measured the event related potential (ERP) and event related optical signal (EROS) responses elicited by pitch deviants in a parametric design. The ERP results revealed the typical modulation of mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitude by degree of deviance. The EROS results showed a similar modulation effect in the temporal cortex and a general temporal cortex followed by frontal cortex activation pattern. Interestingly, medium deviants elicited a greater frontal EROS response than did large or small deviants. Moreover, regression analyses showed that the EROS measures, specifically the linear trend in the temporal cortex and the inverse quadratic trend in the frontal cortex, correlated with the linear trend of the ERP MMN response. Taken together, these results indicate that 1) deviance magnitude modulates the brain activity elicited by pitch stimuli in the STC and IFC within the same time range as electrophysiological measures of passive deviance detection, 2) EROS measures of deviance detection are highly correlated with the ERP MMN, and 3) the functional relationship of STC and IFC is consistent with both the contrast enhancement and response inhibition accounts of IFC activity in passive deviance detection. SN - 1053-8119 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18474433/On_the_functional_role_of_temporal_and_frontal_cortex_activation_in_passive_detection_of_auditory_deviance_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8119(08)00281-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -