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Detection of Actaea racemosa adulteration by thin-layer chromatography and combined thin-layer chromatography-bioluminescence.
J AOAC Int. 2008 Mar-Apr; 91(2):268-75.JA

Abstract

Actaea racemosa L. (black cohosh; syn. Cimicifuga racemosa L. Nutt.) is a native North American perennial whose root and rhizome preparations are commercially available as phytomedicines and dietary supplements, primarily for management of menopausal symptoms. Despite its wide use, methods that accurately identify processed A. racemosa are not well established; product adulteration remains a concern. Because of its similar appearance and growing locales, A. racemosa has been unintentionally mixed with other species of the genus, such as Actaea pachypoda Ell. (white cohosh) and more commonly Actaea podocarpa DC. (yellow cohosh). The genus Actaea also has 23 temperate species with numerous common names, which can also contribute to the misidentification of plant material. Consequently, a variety of Actaea spp. are common adulterants of commercially available black cohosh preparations. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and combined TLC-bioluminescence (Bioluminex) are efficient, economical, and effective techniques which provide characteristic patterns and toxicity profiles for each plant species. These data indicate that common black cohosh adulterants, such as yellow cohosh, can be differentiated from black cohosh by TLC and TLC-bioluminescence. This study also showed that unknown contaminants that were not detected using standard A. racemosa identity techniques were readily detected by TLC and TLC-bioluminescence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ChromaDex Analytics, Inc., 2830 Wilderness P1, Boulder, CO 80301, USA. SherylV@chromadex.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18476337

Citation

Verbitski, Sheryl M., et al. "Detection of Actaea Racemosa Adulteration By Thin-layer Chromatography and Combined Thin-layer Chromatography-bioluminescence." Journal of AOAC International, vol. 91, no. 2, 2008, pp. 268-75.
Verbitski SM, Gourdin GT, Ikenouye LM, et al. Detection of Actaea racemosa adulteration by thin-layer chromatography and combined thin-layer chromatography-bioluminescence. J AOAC Int. 2008;91(2):268-75.
Verbitski, S. M., Gourdin, G. T., Ikenouye, L. M., McChesney, J. D., & Hildreth, J. (2008). Detection of Actaea racemosa adulteration by thin-layer chromatography and combined thin-layer chromatography-bioluminescence. Journal of AOAC International, 91(2), 268-75.
Verbitski SM, et al. Detection of Actaea Racemosa Adulteration By Thin-layer Chromatography and Combined Thin-layer Chromatography-bioluminescence. J AOAC Int. 2008 Mar-Apr;91(2):268-75. PubMed PMID: 18476337.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of Actaea racemosa adulteration by thin-layer chromatography and combined thin-layer chromatography-bioluminescence. AU - Verbitski,Sheryl M, AU - Gourdin,Gerald T, AU - Ikenouye,Larissa M, AU - McChesney,James D, AU - Hildreth,Jana, PY - 2008/5/15/pubmed PY - 2008/6/6/medline PY - 2008/5/15/entrez SP - 268 EP - 75 JF - Journal of AOAC International JO - J AOAC Int VL - 91 IS - 2 N2 - Actaea racemosa L. (black cohosh; syn. Cimicifuga racemosa L. Nutt.) is a native North American perennial whose root and rhizome preparations are commercially available as phytomedicines and dietary supplements, primarily for management of menopausal symptoms. Despite its wide use, methods that accurately identify processed A. racemosa are not well established; product adulteration remains a concern. Because of its similar appearance and growing locales, A. racemosa has been unintentionally mixed with other species of the genus, such as Actaea pachypoda Ell. (white cohosh) and more commonly Actaea podocarpa DC. (yellow cohosh). The genus Actaea also has 23 temperate species with numerous common names, which can also contribute to the misidentification of plant material. Consequently, a variety of Actaea spp. are common adulterants of commercially available black cohosh preparations. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and combined TLC-bioluminescence (Bioluminex) are efficient, economical, and effective techniques which provide characteristic patterns and toxicity profiles for each plant species. These data indicate that common black cohosh adulterants, such as yellow cohosh, can be differentiated from black cohosh by TLC and TLC-bioluminescence. This study also showed that unknown contaminants that were not detected using standard A. racemosa identity techniques were readily detected by TLC and TLC-bioluminescence. SN - 1060-3271 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18476337/Detection_of_Actaea_racemosa_adulteration_by_thin_layer_chromatography_and_combined_thin_layer_chromatography_bioluminescence_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/18476337/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -