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What is "odd" in Posner's location-cueing paradigm? Neural responses to unexpected location and feature changes compared.
J Cogn Neurosci. 2009 Jan; 21(1):30-41.JC

Abstract

Within the parietal cortex, the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) seem to be involved in both spatial and nonspatial functions: Both areas are activated when misleading information is provided by invalid spatial cues in Posner's location-cueing paradigm, but also when infrequent deviant stimuli are presented within a series of standard events. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the distinct and shared brain responses to (i) invalidly cued targets requiring attentional reorienting, and (ii) to target stimuli deviating in color and orientation leading to an oddball-like distraction effect. Both unexpected location and feature changes were accompanied by a significant slowing of manual reaction times. Bilateral TPJ and right superior parietal lobe (SPL) activation was observed in response to invalidly as compared to validly cued targets. In contrast, the bilateral inferior occipito-temporal cortex, the left inferior parietal cortex, right frontal areas, and the cerebellum showed stronger activation in response to deviant than to standard targets. Common activations were observed in the right angular gyrus along the IPS and in the right inferior frontal gyrus. We conclude that the superior parietal and temporo-parietal activations observed here as well as previously in location-cueing paradigms do not merely reflect the detection and processing of unexpected stimuli. Furthermore, our data suggest that the right IPS and the inferior frontal gyrus are involved in attentional selection and distractor processing of both spatial and nonspatial features.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Centre Jülich, Jülich, Germany. s.vossel@fz-juelich.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18476756

Citation

Vossel, Simone, et al. "What Is "odd" in Posner's Location-cueing Paradigm? Neural Responses to Unexpected Location and Feature Changes Compared." Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 21, no. 1, 2009, pp. 30-41.
Vossel S, Weidner R, Thiel CM, et al. What is "odd" in Posner's location-cueing paradigm? Neural responses to unexpected location and feature changes compared. J Cogn Neurosci. 2009;21(1):30-41.
Vossel, S., Weidner, R., Thiel, C. M., & Fink, G. R. (2009). What is "odd" in Posner's location-cueing paradigm? Neural responses to unexpected location and feature changes compared. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 21(1), 30-41. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn.2009.21003
Vossel S, et al. What Is "odd" in Posner's Location-cueing Paradigm? Neural Responses to Unexpected Location and Feature Changes Compared. J Cogn Neurosci. 2009;21(1):30-41. PubMed PMID: 18476756.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What is "odd" in Posner's location-cueing paradigm? Neural responses to unexpected location and feature changes compared. AU - Vossel,Simone, AU - Weidner,Ralph, AU - Thiel,Christiane M, AU - Fink,Gereon R, PY - 2008/5/15/pubmed PY - 2009/2/28/medline PY - 2008/5/15/entrez SP - 30 EP - 41 JF - Journal of cognitive neuroscience JO - J Cogn Neurosci VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - Within the parietal cortex, the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) seem to be involved in both spatial and nonspatial functions: Both areas are activated when misleading information is provided by invalid spatial cues in Posner's location-cueing paradigm, but also when infrequent deviant stimuli are presented within a series of standard events. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the distinct and shared brain responses to (i) invalidly cued targets requiring attentional reorienting, and (ii) to target stimuli deviating in color and orientation leading to an oddball-like distraction effect. Both unexpected location and feature changes were accompanied by a significant slowing of manual reaction times. Bilateral TPJ and right superior parietal lobe (SPL) activation was observed in response to invalidly as compared to validly cued targets. In contrast, the bilateral inferior occipito-temporal cortex, the left inferior parietal cortex, right frontal areas, and the cerebellum showed stronger activation in response to deviant than to standard targets. Common activations were observed in the right angular gyrus along the IPS and in the right inferior frontal gyrus. We conclude that the superior parietal and temporo-parietal activations observed here as well as previously in location-cueing paradigms do not merely reflect the detection and processing of unexpected stimuli. Furthermore, our data suggest that the right IPS and the inferior frontal gyrus are involved in attentional selection and distractor processing of both spatial and nonspatial features. SN - 0898-929X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18476756/What_is_"odd"_in_Posner's_location_cueing_paradigm_Neural_responses_to_unexpected_location_and_feature_changes_compared_ L2 - https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/10.1162/jocn.2009.21003?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -