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Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 May-Jun; 48(3):425-30.AG

Abstract

Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is supposed to be one of the modifiable risk factors that, if treated, may delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relation between serum homocysteine (Hcy) and vitamin levels during AD and its preclinical phase was systematically reviewed. Searches through large literature and trial databases were conducted. Data were extracted from studies and, after quality assessment, analyzed using a meta-analysis software package. Nine qualitatively good case-control studies were identified. The pooled standardized mean difference (PSMD) of Hcy levels (631 patients, 703 controls) was 1.04 (0.44-1.63), indicating higher Hcy levels in AD patients. Levels of folate (PSMD=0.65) (0.34-0.95) (387 patients, 312 controls) and vitamin B(12) (PSMD=0.50) (-0.05-1.06) (387 patients, 312 controls) were lower in AD patients. Vitamin B(6) levels were evaluated in 1 case-control study and were not significantly lower in AD patients. Analysis of prospective cohort studies (2569 subjects) revealed a pooled relative risk for AD in HHcy of 2.5 (1.38-4.56, p<0.01). No specific randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning Hcy-lowering therapy and AD-risk were identified. Prospective studies on the relation between folate, vitamins B(6) and B(12) levels and the risk of developing AD are warranted, preferably in the form of RCTs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jellinek-Mentrum City Center Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic, Roetersstraat 210, 1018 WE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. fvandam@email.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18479766

Citation

Van Dam, Floris, and Willem A. Van Gool. "Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's Disease: a Systematic Review." Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 48, no. 3, 2009, pp. 425-30.
Van Dam F, Van Gool WA. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009;48(3):425-30.
Van Dam, F., & Van Gool, W. A. (2009). Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 48(3), 425-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2008.03.009
Van Dam F, Van Gool WA. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's Disease: a Systematic Review. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 May-Jun;48(3):425-30. PubMed PMID: 18479766.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review. AU - Van Dam,Floris, AU - Van Gool,Willem A, Y1 - 2008/05/13/ PY - 2007/08/27/received PY - 2008/03/10/revised PY - 2008/03/14/accepted PY - 2008/5/16/pubmed PY - 2009/7/23/medline PY - 2008/5/16/entrez SP - 425 EP - 30 JF - Archives of gerontology and geriatrics JO - Arch Gerontol Geriatr VL - 48 IS - 3 N2 - Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is supposed to be one of the modifiable risk factors that, if treated, may delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relation between serum homocysteine (Hcy) and vitamin levels during AD and its preclinical phase was systematically reviewed. Searches through large literature and trial databases were conducted. Data were extracted from studies and, after quality assessment, analyzed using a meta-analysis software package. Nine qualitatively good case-control studies were identified. The pooled standardized mean difference (PSMD) of Hcy levels (631 patients, 703 controls) was 1.04 (0.44-1.63), indicating higher Hcy levels in AD patients. Levels of folate (PSMD=0.65) (0.34-0.95) (387 patients, 312 controls) and vitamin B(12) (PSMD=0.50) (-0.05-1.06) (387 patients, 312 controls) were lower in AD patients. Vitamin B(6) levels were evaluated in 1 case-control study and were not significantly lower in AD patients. Analysis of prospective cohort studies (2569 subjects) revealed a pooled relative risk for AD in HHcy of 2.5 (1.38-4.56, p<0.01). No specific randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning Hcy-lowering therapy and AD-risk were identified. Prospective studies on the relation between folate, vitamins B(6) and B(12) levels and the risk of developing AD are warranted, preferably in the form of RCTs. SN - 1872-6976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18479766/Hyperhomocysteinemia_and_Alzheimer's_disease:_A_systematic_review_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-4943(08)00071-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -