Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Modality-specificity of sensory aging in vision and audition: evidence from event-related potentials.
Brain Res. 2008 Jun 18; 1215:53-68.BR

Abstract

Major accounts of aging implicate changes in processing external stimulus information. Little is known about differential effects of auditory and visual sensory aging, and the mechanisms of sensory aging are still poorly understood. Using event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by unattended stimuli in younger (M=25.5 yrs) and older (M=71.3 yrs) subjects, this study examined mechanisms of sensory aging under minimized attention conditions. Auditory and visual modalities were examined to address modality-specificity vs. generality of sensory aging. Between-modality differences were robust. The earlier-latency responses (P1, N1) were unaffected in the auditory modality but were diminished in the visual modality. The auditory N2 and early visual N2 were diminished. Two similarities between the modalities were age-related enhancements in the late P2 range and positive behavior-early N2 correlation, the latter suggesting that N2 may reflect long-latency inhibition of irrelevant stimuli. Since there is no evidence for salient differences in neuro-biological aging between the two sensory regions, the observed between-modality differences are best explained by the differential reliance of auditory and visual systems on attention. Visual sensory processing relies on facilitation by visuo-spatial attention, withdrawal of which appears to be more disadvantageous in older populations. In contrast, auditory processing is equipped with powerful inhibitory capacities. However, when the whole auditory modality is unattended, thalamo-cortical gating deficits may not manifest in the elderly. In contrast, ERP indices of longer-latency, stimulus-level inhibitory modulation appear to diminish with age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Research and Language, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0113, USA. rceponien@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18482717

Citation

Ceponiene, R, et al. "Modality-specificity of Sensory Aging in Vision and Audition: Evidence From Event-related Potentials." Brain Research, vol. 1215, 2008, pp. 53-68.
Ceponiene R, Westerfield M, Torki M, et al. Modality-specificity of sensory aging in vision and audition: evidence from event-related potentials. Brain Res. 2008;1215:53-68.
Ceponiene, R., Westerfield, M., Torki, M., & Townsend, J. (2008). Modality-specificity of sensory aging in vision and audition: evidence from event-related potentials. Brain Research, 1215, 53-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2008.02.010
Ceponiene R, et al. Modality-specificity of Sensory Aging in Vision and Audition: Evidence From Event-related Potentials. Brain Res. 2008 Jun 18;1215:53-68. PubMed PMID: 18482717.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Modality-specificity of sensory aging in vision and audition: evidence from event-related potentials. AU - Ceponiene,R, AU - Westerfield,M, AU - Torki,M, AU - Townsend,J, Y1 - 2008/02/14/ PY - 2007/08/29/received PY - 2008/01/13/revised PY - 2008/02/04/accepted PY - 2008/5/17/pubmed PY - 2008/9/5/medline PY - 2008/5/17/entrez SP - 53 EP - 68 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res VL - 1215 N2 - Major accounts of aging implicate changes in processing external stimulus information. Little is known about differential effects of auditory and visual sensory aging, and the mechanisms of sensory aging are still poorly understood. Using event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by unattended stimuli in younger (M=25.5 yrs) and older (M=71.3 yrs) subjects, this study examined mechanisms of sensory aging under minimized attention conditions. Auditory and visual modalities were examined to address modality-specificity vs. generality of sensory aging. Between-modality differences were robust. The earlier-latency responses (P1, N1) were unaffected in the auditory modality but were diminished in the visual modality. The auditory N2 and early visual N2 were diminished. Two similarities between the modalities were age-related enhancements in the late P2 range and positive behavior-early N2 correlation, the latter suggesting that N2 may reflect long-latency inhibition of irrelevant stimuli. Since there is no evidence for salient differences in neuro-biological aging between the two sensory regions, the observed between-modality differences are best explained by the differential reliance of auditory and visual systems on attention. Visual sensory processing relies on facilitation by visuo-spatial attention, withdrawal of which appears to be more disadvantageous in older populations. In contrast, auditory processing is equipped with powerful inhibitory capacities. However, when the whole auditory modality is unattended, thalamo-cortical gating deficits may not manifest in the elderly. In contrast, ERP indices of longer-latency, stimulus-level inhibitory modulation appear to diminish with age. SN - 0006-8993 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18482717/Modality_specificity_of_sensory_aging_in_vision_and_audition:_evidence_from_event_related_potentials_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(08)00355-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -