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A 22-year prospective study of fish, n-3 fatty acid intake, and colorectal cancer risk in men.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008; 17(5):1136-43CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Fish is the main dietary source of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, which have been suggested to play a protective role in colorectal cancer development in laboratory and animal studies. Human studies have not shown consistent results. We examined the association between intakes of fish and n-3 fatty acids from fish and colorectal cancer risk in men enrolled in the Physicians' Health Study.

METHODS

The Physicians' Health Study began as a randomized trial to examine the effect of aspirin and beta-carotene supplementation on cancer and cardiovascular disease. Fish intake was assessed at the 12-month follow-up with an abbreviated food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate relative risks for colorectal cancer for the categories of fish intake and quartiles of n-3 fatty acid intake.

RESULTS

During 22 years of follow-up, 500 men had a confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Fish intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk [multivariate relative risk (95% confidence interval) for highest versus lowest category, 0.63 (0.42-0.95); P trend = 0.02] [corrected] The inverse association was observed for both colon and rectal cancers. Our findings for n-3 fatty acids were similar to those for fish; the multivariate relative risk (95% confidence interval) of total colorectal cancer for the highest versus lowest quartile of n-3 fatty acids was 0.74 (0.57-0.95; P trend = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results from this long-term prospective study suggest that intakes of fish and long-chain n-3 fatty acids from fish may decrease the risk for colorectal cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. mh2825@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18483335

Citation

Hall, Megan N., et al. "A 22-year Prospective Study of Fish, N-3 Fatty Acid Intake, and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 17, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1136-43.
Hall MN, Chavarro JE, Lee IM, et al. A 22-year prospective study of fish, n-3 fatty acid intake, and colorectal cancer risk in men. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008;17(5):1136-43.
Hall, M. N., Chavarro, J. E., Lee, I. M., Willett, W. C., & Ma, J. (2008). A 22-year prospective study of fish, n-3 fatty acid intake, and colorectal cancer risk in men. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 17(5), pp. 1136-43. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-2803.
Hall MN, et al. A 22-year Prospective Study of Fish, N-3 Fatty Acid Intake, and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008;17(5):1136-43. PubMed PMID: 18483335.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A 22-year prospective study of fish, n-3 fatty acid intake, and colorectal cancer risk in men. AU - Hall,Megan N, AU - Chavarro,Jorge E, AU - Lee,I-Min, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Ma,Jing, PY - 2008/5/17/pubmed PY - 2008/10/1/medline PY - 2008/5/17/entrez SP - 1136 EP - 43 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Fish is the main dietary source of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, which have been suggested to play a protective role in colorectal cancer development in laboratory and animal studies. Human studies have not shown consistent results. We examined the association between intakes of fish and n-3 fatty acids from fish and colorectal cancer risk in men enrolled in the Physicians' Health Study. METHODS: The Physicians' Health Study began as a randomized trial to examine the effect of aspirin and beta-carotene supplementation on cancer and cardiovascular disease. Fish intake was assessed at the 12-month follow-up with an abbreviated food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate relative risks for colorectal cancer for the categories of fish intake and quartiles of n-3 fatty acid intake. RESULTS: During 22 years of follow-up, 500 men had a confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Fish intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk [multivariate relative risk (95% confidence interval) for highest versus lowest category, 0.63 (0.42-0.95); P trend = 0.02] [corrected] The inverse association was observed for both colon and rectal cancers. Our findings for n-3 fatty acids were similar to those for fish; the multivariate relative risk (95% confidence interval) of total colorectal cancer for the highest versus lowest quartile of n-3 fatty acids was 0.74 (0.57-0.95; P trend = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our results from this long-term prospective study suggest that intakes of fish and long-chain n-3 fatty acids from fish may decrease the risk for colorectal cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18483335/A_22_year_prospective_study_of_fish_n_3_fatty_acid_intake_and_colorectal_cancer_risk_in_men_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18483335 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -