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Gender differences in patterns of HIV service use in a national sample of HIV-positive Australians.
AIDS Care. 2008 May; 20(5):547-52.AC

Abstract

There have been clear gender differences in the experience of living with HIV in Australia since the start of the epidemic. This paper examines the patterns of health service use and experiences at those services over a period of six years. The results reported here are drawn from the HIV Futures surveys, four consecutive national, cross-sectional Australian surveys of the lives of PLWHA. Women were found to use different medical services to men both for non HIV-related and HIV-related treatment, being more likely to use generalist services and hospital-based HIV specialists. Women also reported higher rates of discrimination at health services, however reports of new incidences of discrimination were found to decrease from 2001 onwards. Although women reported higher levels of unwanted disclosure of HIV status than men, particularly by health care workers, new reports of unwanted disclosure decreased between 2003 and 2005. These data indicate that there are long-term gender differences in medical service use by PLWHA in Australia, and that this has been associated with higher rates of discrimination and loss of confidentiality for women. However the decrease in new reports of discrimination over time indicates that improved education of health service providers has been successful.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. r.thorpe@latrobe.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18484323

Citation

Thorpe, Rachel, et al. "Gender Differences in Patterns of HIV Service Use in a National Sample of HIV-positive Australians." AIDS Care, vol. 20, no. 5, 2008, pp. 547-52.
Thorpe R, Grierson J, Pitts M. Gender differences in patterns of HIV service use in a national sample of HIV-positive Australians. AIDS Care. 2008;20(5):547-52.
Thorpe, R., Grierson, J., & Pitts, M. (2008). Gender differences in patterns of HIV service use in a national sample of HIV-positive Australians. AIDS Care, 20(5), 547-52. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540120701868329
Thorpe R, Grierson J, Pitts M. Gender Differences in Patterns of HIV Service Use in a National Sample of HIV-positive Australians. AIDS Care. 2008;20(5):547-52. PubMed PMID: 18484323.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender differences in patterns of HIV service use in a national sample of HIV-positive Australians. AU - Thorpe,Rachel, AU - Grierson,Jeffrey, AU - Pitts,Marian, PY - 2008/5/20/pubmed PY - 2008/7/11/medline PY - 2008/5/20/entrez SP - 547 EP - 52 JF - AIDS care JO - AIDS Care VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - There have been clear gender differences in the experience of living with HIV in Australia since the start of the epidemic. This paper examines the patterns of health service use and experiences at those services over a period of six years. The results reported here are drawn from the HIV Futures surveys, four consecutive national, cross-sectional Australian surveys of the lives of PLWHA. Women were found to use different medical services to men both for non HIV-related and HIV-related treatment, being more likely to use generalist services and hospital-based HIV specialists. Women also reported higher rates of discrimination at health services, however reports of new incidences of discrimination were found to decrease from 2001 onwards. Although women reported higher levels of unwanted disclosure of HIV status than men, particularly by health care workers, new reports of unwanted disclosure decreased between 2003 and 2005. These data indicate that there are long-term gender differences in medical service use by PLWHA in Australia, and that this has been associated with higher rates of discrimination and loss of confidentiality for women. However the decrease in new reports of discrimination over time indicates that improved education of health service providers has been successful. SN - 1360-0451 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18484323/Gender_differences_in_patterns_of_HIV_service_use_in_a_national_sample_of_HIV_positive_Australians_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540120701868329 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -