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Dietary sodium alginate administration affects fingerling growth and resistance to Streptococcus sp. and iridovirus, and juvenile non-specific immune responses of the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.
Fish Shellfish Immunol. 2008 Jul; 25(1-2):19-27.FS

Abstract

The percent weight gain (PWG) and feeding efficiency (FE) of fingerling orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, fed diets containing sodium alginate at 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) were calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th weeks after feeding. Survival rates of the fingerling grouper against Streptococcus sp. and an iridovirus, and non-specific immune parameters such as alternative complement activity (ACH50), lysozyme activity, natural haemagglutination activity, respiratory bursts, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and phagocytic activity of juvenile grouper were also determined when the fish were fed diets containing sodium alginate at 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g kg(-1). The PWG and FE of fish were better when the fish were fed diets containing sodium alginate at 1.0, and 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1), respectively. The PWG and FE of fish fed the 0, 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) sodium alginate-containing diets after 8 weeks were 271.0%, 454.4% and 327.8%, and 0.61, 0.72 and 0.68, respectively. Fish fed a diet containing sodium alginate at the level of 2.0 g kg(-1) had a significantly higher survival rate than those fed the control diet after challenge with Streptococcus sp. and an iridovirus causing an increase of survival rate by 25.0% and 16.7%, respectively, compared to the control group. The ACH(50) level of fish fed the sodium alginate-containing diets at 2.0 g kg(-1) was significantly higher than those fed the 1.0 g kg(-1) sodium alginate diet and control diet after 12 days, and had increased to 1.9-fold, compared to those fed the control diet. The lysozyme activity, phagocytic activity, respiratory bursts, and SOD level of fish fed the sodium alginate-containing diets at 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) were significantly higher than those fed the control diet after 12 days, and had increased to 1.97- and 1.68-fold, 1.35- and 1.50-fold, 1.63- and 1.81-fold, and 1.23- and 1.31-fold, respectively, compared to those fed the control diet. We therefore recommend dietary sodium alginate administration at 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1), respectively, to promote growth and enhance immunity and resistance against Streptococcus sp. and an iridovirus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Aquaculture, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18485740

Citation

Yeh, Shinn-Pyng, et al. "Dietary Sodium Alginate Administration Affects Fingerling Growth and Resistance to Streptococcus Sp. and Iridovirus, and Juvenile Non-specific Immune Responses of the Orange-spotted Grouper, Epinephelus Coioides." Fish & Shellfish Immunology, vol. 25, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 19-27.
Yeh SP, Chang CA, Chang CY, et al. Dietary sodium alginate administration affects fingerling growth and resistance to Streptococcus sp. and iridovirus, and juvenile non-specific immune responses of the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Fish Shellfish Immunol. 2008;25(1-2):19-27.
Yeh, S. P., Chang, C. A., Chang, C. Y., Liu, C. H., & Cheng, W. (2008). Dietary sodium alginate administration affects fingerling growth and resistance to Streptococcus sp. and iridovirus, and juvenile non-specific immune responses of the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Fish & Shellfish Immunology, 25(1-2), 19-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fsi.2007.11.011
Yeh SP, et al. Dietary Sodium Alginate Administration Affects Fingerling Growth and Resistance to Streptococcus Sp. and Iridovirus, and Juvenile Non-specific Immune Responses of the Orange-spotted Grouper, Epinephelus Coioides. Fish Shellfish Immunol. 2008;25(1-2):19-27. PubMed PMID: 18485740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary sodium alginate administration affects fingerling growth and resistance to Streptococcus sp. and iridovirus, and juvenile non-specific immune responses of the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. AU - Yeh,Shinn-Pyng, AU - Chang,Chen-An, AU - Chang,Chi-Yao, AU - Liu,Chun-Hung, AU - Cheng,Winton, Y1 - 2007/12/03/ PY - 2007/07/27/received PY - 2007/11/12/revised PY - 2007/11/18/accepted PY - 2008/5/20/pubmed PY - 2008/9/26/medline PY - 2008/5/20/entrez SP - 19 EP - 27 JF - Fish & shellfish immunology JO - Fish Shellfish Immunol VL - 25 IS - 1-2 N2 - The percent weight gain (PWG) and feeding efficiency (FE) of fingerling orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, fed diets containing sodium alginate at 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) were calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th weeks after feeding. Survival rates of the fingerling grouper against Streptococcus sp. and an iridovirus, and non-specific immune parameters such as alternative complement activity (ACH50), lysozyme activity, natural haemagglutination activity, respiratory bursts, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and phagocytic activity of juvenile grouper were also determined when the fish were fed diets containing sodium alginate at 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g kg(-1). The PWG and FE of fish were better when the fish were fed diets containing sodium alginate at 1.0, and 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1), respectively. The PWG and FE of fish fed the 0, 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) sodium alginate-containing diets after 8 weeks were 271.0%, 454.4% and 327.8%, and 0.61, 0.72 and 0.68, respectively. Fish fed a diet containing sodium alginate at the level of 2.0 g kg(-1) had a significantly higher survival rate than those fed the control diet after challenge with Streptococcus sp. and an iridovirus causing an increase of survival rate by 25.0% and 16.7%, respectively, compared to the control group. The ACH(50) level of fish fed the sodium alginate-containing diets at 2.0 g kg(-1) was significantly higher than those fed the 1.0 g kg(-1) sodium alginate diet and control diet after 12 days, and had increased to 1.9-fold, compared to those fed the control diet. The lysozyme activity, phagocytic activity, respiratory bursts, and SOD level of fish fed the sodium alginate-containing diets at 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) were significantly higher than those fed the control diet after 12 days, and had increased to 1.97- and 1.68-fold, 1.35- and 1.50-fold, 1.63- and 1.81-fold, and 1.23- and 1.31-fold, respectively, compared to those fed the control diet. We therefore recommend dietary sodium alginate administration at 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1), respectively, to promote growth and enhance immunity and resistance against Streptococcus sp. and an iridovirus. SN - 1050-4648 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18485740/Dietary_sodium_alginate_administration_affects_fingerling_growth_and_resistance_to_Streptococcus_sp__and_iridovirus_and_juvenile_non_specific_immune_responses_of_the_orange_spotted_grouper_Epinephelus_coioides_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1050-4648(07)00201-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -