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Muslim and non-Muslim adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights.
Child Dev. 2008 May-Jun; 79(3):514-28.CD

Abstract

An experimental questionnaire study, conducted in The Netherlands, examined adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. Muslim minority and non-Muslim majority adolescents (12-18 years) made judgments of different types of behaviors and different contexts. The group membership of participants had a clear effect. Muslim participants were less in favor of freedom of speech if it involved the offending of religious beliefs and were more in favor of Muslim minority rights. There were also cross-group gender differences whereby parental practices that negatively affect females were more strongly rejected by Muslim females than by Muslim males and non-Muslim females and males. The findings are discussed with reference to social-cognitive domain theory and intergroup theories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Social Sciences, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands. M.Verkuyten@uu.nlNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18489410

Citation

Verkuyten, Maykel, and Luuk Slooter. "Muslim and non-Muslim Adolescents' Reasoning About Freedom of Speech and Minority Rights." Child Development, vol. 79, no. 3, 2008, pp. 514-28.
Verkuyten M, Slooter L. Muslim and non-Muslim adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. Child Dev. 2008;79(3):514-28.
Verkuyten, M., & Slooter, L. (2008). Muslim and non-Muslim adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. Child Development, 79(3), 514-28. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01140.x
Verkuyten M, Slooter L. Muslim and non-Muslim Adolescents' Reasoning About Freedom of Speech and Minority Rights. Child Dev. 2008 May-Jun;79(3):514-28. PubMed PMID: 18489410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Muslim and non-Muslim adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. AU - Verkuyten,Maykel, AU - Slooter,Luuk, PY - 2008/5/21/pubmed PY - 2008/7/18/medline PY - 2008/5/21/entrez SP - 514 EP - 28 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 79 IS - 3 N2 - An experimental questionnaire study, conducted in The Netherlands, examined adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. Muslim minority and non-Muslim majority adolescents (12-18 years) made judgments of different types of behaviors and different contexts. The group membership of participants had a clear effect. Muslim participants were less in favor of freedom of speech if it involved the offending of religious beliefs and were more in favor of Muslim minority rights. There were also cross-group gender differences whereby parental practices that negatively affect females were more strongly rejected by Muslim females than by Muslim males and non-Muslim females and males. The findings are discussed with reference to social-cognitive domain theory and intergroup theories. SN - 1467-8624 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18489410/Muslim_and_non_Muslim_adolescents'_reasoning_about_freedom_of_speech_and_minority_rights_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01140.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -