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Values as protective factors against violent behavior in Jewish and Arab high schools in Israel.
Child Dev. 2008 May-Jun; 79(3):652-67.CD

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that values, abstract goals serving as guiding life principles, become relatively important predictors of adolescents' self-reported violent behavior in school environments in which violence is relatively common. The study employed a students-nested-in-schools design. Arab and Jewish adolescents (N = 907, M age = 16.8), attending 33 Israeli schools, reported their values and their own violent behavior. Power values correlated positively, and universalism and conformity correlated negatively with self-reported violent behavior, accounting for 12% of the variance in violent behavior, whereas school membership accounted for 6% of the variance. In schools in which violence was more common, power values' relationship with adolescents' self-reported violence was especially positive, and the relationship of universalism with self-reported violence was especially negative.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905, Israel. msarielk@mscc.huji.ac.ilNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18489419

Citation

Knafo, Ariel, et al. "Values as Protective Factors Against Violent Behavior in Jewish and Arab High Schools in Israel." Child Development, vol. 79, no. 3, 2008, pp. 652-67.
Knafo A, Daniel E, Khoury-Kassabri M. Values as protective factors against violent behavior in Jewish and Arab high schools in Israel. Child Dev. 2008;79(3):652-67.
Knafo, A., Daniel, E., & Khoury-Kassabri, M. (2008). Values as protective factors against violent behavior in Jewish and Arab high schools in Israel. Child Development, 79(3), 652-67. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01149.x
Knafo A, Daniel E, Khoury-Kassabri M. Values as Protective Factors Against Violent Behavior in Jewish and Arab High Schools in Israel. Child Dev. 2008 May-Jun;79(3):652-67. PubMed PMID: 18489419.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Values as protective factors against violent behavior in Jewish and Arab high schools in Israel. AU - Knafo,Ariel, AU - Daniel,Ella, AU - Khoury-Kassabri,Mona, PY - 2008/5/21/pubmed PY - 2008/7/18/medline PY - 2008/5/21/entrez SP - 652 EP - 67 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 79 IS - 3 N2 - This study tested the hypothesis that values, abstract goals serving as guiding life principles, become relatively important predictors of adolescents' self-reported violent behavior in school environments in which violence is relatively common. The study employed a students-nested-in-schools design. Arab and Jewish adolescents (N = 907, M age = 16.8), attending 33 Israeli schools, reported their values and their own violent behavior. Power values correlated positively, and universalism and conformity correlated negatively with self-reported violent behavior, accounting for 12% of the variance in violent behavior, whereas school membership accounted for 6% of the variance. In schools in which violence was more common, power values' relationship with adolescents' self-reported violence was especially positive, and the relationship of universalism with self-reported violence was especially negative. SN - 1467-8624 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18489419/Values_as_protective_factors_against_violent_behavior_in_Jewish_and_Arab_high_schools_in_Israel_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01149.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -