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Associations of adiponectin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha with insulin resistance.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Aug; 93(8):3165-72.JC

Abstract

CONTEXT

Adipose tissue-derived adipokines may contribute to insulin resistance.

OBJECTIVE

We tested the hypothesis that adipokines are associated with insulin resistance in a community-based cohort and that associations are maintained in people with and without the metabolic syndrome (high vs. low risk of diabetes).

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

We studied a cross-sectional sample of 2356 individuals attending the seventh examination (1998-2001) of the Framingham Offspring Study. We measured levels of glucose, insulin, adiponectin, resistin, and TNFalpha in fasting blood samples and defined metabolic syndrome by updated National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. We used ANOVA to test associations of adipokines with insulin resistance and multivariable logistic regression models to assess joint associations of adipokines and metabolic syndrome with insulin resistance.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Homeostasis model (HOMA-IR), with insulin resistance defined by HOMA-IR greater than the 75th percentile, was measured.

RESULTS

Age- and sex-adjusted HOMA-IR levels were inversely related to adiponectin (r = -0.40, P < 0.0001) and positively related to resistin (r = 0.13, P < 0.0001) and TNFalpha (r = 0.12, P < 0.0001). The prevalence of insulin resistance increased with decreasing tertiles of adiponectin (from 10.9% in the third to 42.5% in the first tertile; P < 0.0001) and increasing tertiles of resistin (from 19.3 to 30.9%; P < 0.0001) and TNFalpha (from 18.8 to 32.0%; P < 0.0001). Results were similar after adjustment for body mass index. These associations were present in individuals with or without the metabolic syndrome. In multivariable regression models, metabolic syndrome and adipokines individually and jointly were significantly associated with insulin resistance.

CONCLUSION

Adverse levels of adipokines are associated with insulin resistance in individuals at low or high diabetes risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18492747

Citation

Hivert, Marie-France, et al. "Associations of Adiponectin, Resistin, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha With Insulin Resistance." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 93, no. 8, 2008, pp. 3165-72.
Hivert MF, Sullivan LM, Fox CS, et al. Associations of adiponectin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha with insulin resistance. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008;93(8):3165-72.
Hivert, M. F., Sullivan, L. M., Fox, C. S., Nathan, D. M., D'Agostino, R. B., Wilson, P. W., & Meigs, J. B. (2008). Associations of adiponectin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha with insulin resistance. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 93(8), 3165-72. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2008-0425
Hivert MF, et al. Associations of Adiponectin, Resistin, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha With Insulin Resistance. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008;93(8):3165-72. PubMed PMID: 18492747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of adiponectin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha with insulin resistance. AU - Hivert,Marie-France, AU - Sullivan,Lisa M, AU - Fox,Caroline S, AU - Nathan,David M, AU - D'Agostino,Ralph B,Sr AU - Wilson,Peter W F, AU - Meigs,James B, Y1 - 2008/05/20/ PY - 2008/5/22/pubmed PY - 2008/9/9/medline PY - 2008/5/22/entrez SP - 3165 EP - 72 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 93 IS - 8 N2 - CONTEXT: Adipose tissue-derived adipokines may contribute to insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that adipokines are associated with insulin resistance in a community-based cohort and that associations are maintained in people with and without the metabolic syndrome (high vs. low risk of diabetes). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We studied a cross-sectional sample of 2356 individuals attending the seventh examination (1998-2001) of the Framingham Offspring Study. We measured levels of glucose, insulin, adiponectin, resistin, and TNFalpha in fasting blood samples and defined metabolic syndrome by updated National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. We used ANOVA to test associations of adipokines with insulin resistance and multivariable logistic regression models to assess joint associations of adipokines and metabolic syndrome with insulin resistance. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Homeostasis model (HOMA-IR), with insulin resistance defined by HOMA-IR greater than the 75th percentile, was measured. RESULTS: Age- and sex-adjusted HOMA-IR levels were inversely related to adiponectin (r = -0.40, P < 0.0001) and positively related to resistin (r = 0.13, P < 0.0001) and TNFalpha (r = 0.12, P < 0.0001). The prevalence of insulin resistance increased with decreasing tertiles of adiponectin (from 10.9% in the third to 42.5% in the first tertile; P < 0.0001) and increasing tertiles of resistin (from 19.3 to 30.9%; P < 0.0001) and TNFalpha (from 18.8 to 32.0%; P < 0.0001). Results were similar after adjustment for body mass index. These associations were present in individuals with or without the metabolic syndrome. In multivariable regression models, metabolic syndrome and adipokines individually and jointly were significantly associated with insulin resistance. CONCLUSION: Adverse levels of adipokines are associated with insulin resistance in individuals at low or high diabetes risk. SN - 0021-972X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18492747/Associations_of_adiponectin_resistin_and_tumor_necrosis_factor_alpha_with_insulin_resistance_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2008-0425 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -