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Wheeze and asthma in children: associations with body mass index, sports, television viewing, and diet.
Epidemiology. 2008 Sep; 19(5):747-55.E

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Obesity, physical activity, and dietary habits are distinct but strongly interrelated lifestyle factors that may be relevant to the prevalence of wheeze and asthma in children. Our goal was to analyze the relationship of body mass index (BMI), regular sports participation, TV viewing, and diet with current wheezing and asthma.

METHODS

We investigated 20,016 children, aged 6-7 years, who were enrolled in a population-based study. Parents completed standardized questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), while adjusting for several confounders and simultaneously considering BMI, regular sports activity, TV viewing and selected dietary items.

RESULTS

A total of 1575 children (7.9%) reported current wheezing and 1343 (6.7%) reported current asthma. In a multivariate model, an elevated BMI was associated with wheeze and current asthma: children from the highest quintile (compared with the lowest quintile) had an increased risk of wheeze (OR = 1.47; CI = 1.20-1.82) or current asthma (1.61; 1.28-2.01). Wheeze or asthma was not associated with regular sports activity. Subjects who spent 5 or more hours per day watching television were more likely to experience wheeze (1.53; 1.08-2.17) or current asthma (1.51; 1.04-2.2) compared with those who viewed TV less than 1 hour a day. Adding salt to food was strongly and independently associated with current wheeze (2.58; 1.41-4.71) and current asthma (2.68; 1.41-5.09).

CONCLUSIONS

Our data support the hypothesis that high body weight, spending a lot of time watching television, and a salty diet each independently increase the risk of asthma symptoms in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Respiratory Physiology Department, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. gmcorbo@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18496466

Citation

Corbo, Giuseppe M., et al. "Wheeze and Asthma in Children: Associations With Body Mass Index, Sports, Television Viewing, and Diet." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 19, no. 5, 2008, pp. 747-55.
Corbo GM, Forastiere F, De Sario M, et al. Wheeze and asthma in children: associations with body mass index, sports, television viewing, and diet. Epidemiology. 2008;19(5):747-55.
Corbo, G. M., Forastiere, F., De Sario, M., Brunetti, L., Bonci, E., Bugiani, M., Chellini, E., La Grutta, S., Migliore, E., Pistelli, R., Rusconi, F., Russo, A., Simoni, M., Talassi, F., & Galassi, C. (2008). Wheeze and asthma in children: associations with body mass index, sports, television viewing, and diet. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 19(5), 747-55. https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181776213
Corbo GM, et al. Wheeze and Asthma in Children: Associations With Body Mass Index, Sports, Television Viewing, and Diet. Epidemiology. 2008;19(5):747-55. PubMed PMID: 18496466.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Wheeze and asthma in children: associations with body mass index, sports, television viewing, and diet. AU - Corbo,Giuseppe M, AU - Forastiere,Francesco, AU - De Sario,Manuela, AU - Brunetti,Luigia, AU - Bonci,Enea, AU - Bugiani,Massimiliano, AU - Chellini,Elisabetta, AU - La Grutta,Stefania, AU - Migliore,Enrica, AU - Pistelli,Riccardo, AU - Rusconi,Franca, AU - Russo,Antonio, AU - Simoni,Marzia, AU - Talassi,Fiorella, AU - Galassi,Claudia, AU - ,, PY - 2008/5/23/pubmed PY - 2008/9/3/medline PY - 2008/5/23/entrez SP - 747 EP - 55 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity, physical activity, and dietary habits are distinct but strongly interrelated lifestyle factors that may be relevant to the prevalence of wheeze and asthma in children. Our goal was to analyze the relationship of body mass index (BMI), regular sports participation, TV viewing, and diet with current wheezing and asthma. METHODS: We investigated 20,016 children, aged 6-7 years, who were enrolled in a population-based study. Parents completed standardized questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), while adjusting for several confounders and simultaneously considering BMI, regular sports activity, TV viewing and selected dietary items. RESULTS: A total of 1575 children (7.9%) reported current wheezing and 1343 (6.7%) reported current asthma. In a multivariate model, an elevated BMI was associated with wheeze and current asthma: children from the highest quintile (compared with the lowest quintile) had an increased risk of wheeze (OR = 1.47; CI = 1.20-1.82) or current asthma (1.61; 1.28-2.01). Wheeze or asthma was not associated with regular sports activity. Subjects who spent 5 or more hours per day watching television were more likely to experience wheeze (1.53; 1.08-2.17) or current asthma (1.51; 1.04-2.2) compared with those who viewed TV less than 1 hour a day. Adding salt to food was strongly and independently associated with current wheeze (2.58; 1.41-4.71) and current asthma (2.68; 1.41-5.09). CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that high body weight, spending a lot of time watching television, and a salty diet each independently increase the risk of asthma symptoms in children. SN - 1531-5487 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18496466/Wheeze_and_asthma_in_children:_associations_with_body_mass_index_sports_television_viewing_and_diet_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181776213 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -