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Benefit of concomitant gastrointestinal and gynaecological evaluation in premenopausal women with iron deficiency anaemia.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Aug 15; 28(4):422-30.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is common in premenopausal women and menorrhagia is often considered responsible. Aim To evaluate prospectively the occurrence of bleeding and iron malabsorption related gastrointestinal (GI) diseases likely responsible of IDA in premenopausal women regardless of their menstrual flow.

METHODS

One hundred and eighty-seven premenopausal women [median age 39 (20-56) years] irrespective of their menstrual flow underwent gastroscopy with gastric and duodenal biopsies and faecal occult blood test (FOBT). Patients over 50 years, positive 1st degree family history for colonic cancer and/or positive FOBT underwent colonoscopy too.

RESULTS

Menorrhagia was present in 67.4% of premenopausal women. A possible GI cause of IDA was found in 129/187 patients; in 65.2% the cause of IDA was possibly related to iron malabsorption diseases. GI bleeding as a cause of IDA was found in seven patients. An exclusive GI cause of IDA was found in 26.7% of premenopausal women, whereas a possible GI cause was observed in 34.2% of menorrhagic premenopausal women. The main risk factor for the presence of likely GI causes was the presence of upper GI symptoms (OR 5.2: 95% CI = 1.6-16.4).

CONCLUSIONS

Most premenopausal women had a possible upper GI cause of IDA because of diseases related to iron malabsorption. Menorrhagia and a GI cause coexist in one-third of women with iron-deficiency anaemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Digestive and Liver Disease, Hospital Sant'Andrea, II School of Medicine, University Sapienza of Rome, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18498447

Citation

Vannella, L, et al. "Benefit of Concomitant Gastrointestinal and Gynaecological Evaluation in Premenopausal Women With Iron Deficiency Anaemia." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 28, no. 4, 2008, pp. 422-30.
Vannella L, Aloe Spiriti MA, Cozza G, et al. Benefit of concomitant gastrointestinal and gynaecological evaluation in premenopausal women with iron deficiency anaemia. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008;28(4):422-30.
Vannella, L., Aloe Spiriti, M. A., Cozza, G., Tardella, L., Monarca, B., Cuteri, A., Moscarini, M., Delle Fave, G., & Annibale, B. (2008). Benefit of concomitant gastrointestinal and gynaecological evaluation in premenopausal women with iron deficiency anaemia. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 28(4), 422-30. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03741.x
Vannella L, et al. Benefit of Concomitant Gastrointestinal and Gynaecological Evaluation in Premenopausal Women With Iron Deficiency Anaemia. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Aug 15;28(4):422-30. PubMed PMID: 18498447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Benefit of concomitant gastrointestinal and gynaecological evaluation in premenopausal women with iron deficiency anaemia. AU - Vannella,L, AU - Aloe Spiriti,M A, AU - Cozza,G, AU - Tardella,L, AU - Monarca,B, AU - Cuteri,A, AU - Moscarini,M, AU - Delle Fave,G, AU - Annibale,B, Y1 - 2008/05/22/ PY - 2008/5/24/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/5/24/entrez SP - 422 EP - 30 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment Pharmacol Ther VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is common in premenopausal women and menorrhagia is often considered responsible. Aim To evaluate prospectively the occurrence of bleeding and iron malabsorption related gastrointestinal (GI) diseases likely responsible of IDA in premenopausal women regardless of their menstrual flow. METHODS: One hundred and eighty-seven premenopausal women [median age 39 (20-56) years] irrespective of their menstrual flow underwent gastroscopy with gastric and duodenal biopsies and faecal occult blood test (FOBT). Patients over 50 years, positive 1st degree family history for colonic cancer and/or positive FOBT underwent colonoscopy too. RESULTS: Menorrhagia was present in 67.4% of premenopausal women. A possible GI cause of IDA was found in 129/187 patients; in 65.2% the cause of IDA was possibly related to iron malabsorption diseases. GI bleeding as a cause of IDA was found in seven patients. An exclusive GI cause of IDA was found in 26.7% of premenopausal women, whereas a possible GI cause was observed in 34.2% of menorrhagic premenopausal women. The main risk factor for the presence of likely GI causes was the presence of upper GI symptoms (OR 5.2: 95% CI = 1.6-16.4). CONCLUSIONS: Most premenopausal women had a possible upper GI cause of IDA because of diseases related to iron malabsorption. Menorrhagia and a GI cause coexist in one-third of women with iron-deficiency anaemia. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18498447/Benefit_of_concomitant_gastrointestinal_and_gynaecological_evaluation_in_premenopausal_women_with_iron_deficiency_anaemia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03741.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -