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Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil from Eremanthus erythropappus leaves.
J Pharm Pharmacol. 2008 Jun; 60(6):771-7.JP

Abstract

The chemical composition of the essential oil from air-dried leaves of Eremanthus erythropappus was studied. The main compounds were beta-pinene (23.24%), beta-caryophyllene (22.92%), beta-myrcene (10.03%) and germacrene D (9.40%). The essential oil had an LD50 of 2.90 g kg(-1) in mice. Doses of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) inhibited 10.69% and 27.06% of acetic-acid-induced writhing in mice, respectively. In the formalin-induced nociception test in mice, the essential oil inhibited the first phase of paw licking by 29.13% (400 mg kg(-1)) and the second phase by 32.74% (200 mg kg(-1)) and 37.55% (400 mg kg(-1)). In the hot-plate test in mice, doses of 200 mg kg(-1) and 400 mg kg(-1) significantly increased the reaction time after 30, 60 and 90 min of treatment. Doses of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) inhibited carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats by 15.18% and 36.61%, respectively. Doses of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) administered 4 h before intrapleural injection of carrageenan significantly reduced exudate volume (by 20.20% and 48.70%, respectively) and leucocyte mobilization (by 5.88% and 17.29%, respectively). These results demonstrate that E. erythropappus has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, supporting the use of this plant in folk medicine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento Farmacêutico, Faculdade de Farmácia e Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36016-330, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil. orlando.sousa@ufjf.edu.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18498714

Citation

Sousa, Orlando V., et al. "Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Effects of the Essential Oil From Eremanthus Erythropappus Leaves." The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, vol. 60, no. 6, 2008, pp. 771-7.
Sousa OV, Silvério MS, Del-Vechio-Vieira G, et al. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil from Eremanthus erythropappus leaves. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2008;60(6):771-7.
Sousa, O. V., Silvério, M. S., Del-Vechio-Vieira, G., Matheus, F. C., Yamamoto, C. H., & Alves, M. S. (2008). Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil from Eremanthus erythropappus leaves. The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 60(6), 771-7. https://doi.org/10.1211/jpp.60.6.0013
Sousa OV, et al. Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Effects of the Essential Oil From Eremanthus Erythropappus Leaves. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2008;60(6):771-7. PubMed PMID: 18498714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil from Eremanthus erythropappus leaves. AU - Sousa,Orlando V, AU - Silvério,Marcelo S, AU - Del-Vechio-Vieira,Glauciemar, AU - Matheus,Filipe C, AU - Yamamoto,Célia H, AU - Alves,Maria S, PY - 2008/5/24/pubmed PY - 2008/9/3/medline PY - 2008/5/24/entrez SP - 771 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology JO - J. Pharm. Pharmacol. VL - 60 IS - 6 N2 - The chemical composition of the essential oil from air-dried leaves of Eremanthus erythropappus was studied. The main compounds were beta-pinene (23.24%), beta-caryophyllene (22.92%), beta-myrcene (10.03%) and germacrene D (9.40%). The essential oil had an LD50 of 2.90 g kg(-1) in mice. Doses of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) inhibited 10.69% and 27.06% of acetic-acid-induced writhing in mice, respectively. In the formalin-induced nociception test in mice, the essential oil inhibited the first phase of paw licking by 29.13% (400 mg kg(-1)) and the second phase by 32.74% (200 mg kg(-1)) and 37.55% (400 mg kg(-1)). In the hot-plate test in mice, doses of 200 mg kg(-1) and 400 mg kg(-1) significantly increased the reaction time after 30, 60 and 90 min of treatment. Doses of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) inhibited carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats by 15.18% and 36.61%, respectively. Doses of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) administered 4 h before intrapleural injection of carrageenan significantly reduced exudate volume (by 20.20% and 48.70%, respectively) and leucocyte mobilization (by 5.88% and 17.29%, respectively). These results demonstrate that E. erythropappus has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, supporting the use of this plant in folk medicine. SN - 0022-3573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18498714/Antinociceptive_and_anti_inflammatory_effects_of_the_essential_oil_from_Eremanthus_erythropappus_leaves_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1211/jpp.60.6.0013 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -