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Chickpeas may influence fatty acid and fiber intake in an ad libitum diet, leading to small improvements in serum lipid profile and glycemic control.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Jun; 108(6):1009-13.JA

Abstract

Optimal replacement macronutrient/s for dietary saturated fat to reduce cardiovascular disease risk remains controversial. Chickpeas are rich in dietary fiber and polyunsaturated fatty acids. This exploratory study, conducted from September 2004 to May 2005, assessed the effect of incorporating chickpeas in the ad libitum diet of 45 free-living adults. Participants consumed a minimum of 728 g of canned, drained chickpeas per week (the amount in four 300-g cans) as part of their habitual diet for 12 weeks (chickpea phase), followed by 4 weeks of habitual diet without chickpeas (usual phase). In the chickpea phase, mean dietary fiber intake was 6.77 g/day more and mean polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption (as a percentage of total fat) was 2.66% more (both P<0.001), causing the polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio to change from 0.39 to 0.47 (P=0.045). Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were 7.7 mg/dL (0.20 mmol/L) and 7.3 mg/dL (0.19 mmol/L) less, respectively, after the chickpea phase (P<or=0.01), fasting insulin was 0.75 microIU/mL (5.21 pmol/L) less (P=0.045), and the homeostasis assessment model of insulin resistance was 0.21 less (P=0.01). Univariate analysis revealed that dietary fiber had the greatest single effect, reducing serum total cholesterol by 15.8 mg/dL (0.41 mmol/L) (P=0.01). Polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids had equivalent but opposing effects on serum total cholesterol and insulin. Larger studies on populations with greater degrees of hypercholesterolemia and/or hyperglycemia than the participants in this study are warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Human Life Sciences, University of Tasmania, Locked Bag 1320, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia 7250.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18502235

Citation

Pittaway, Jane K., et al. "Chickpeas May Influence Fatty Acid and Fiber Intake in an Ad Libitum Diet, Leading to Small Improvements in Serum Lipid Profile and Glycemic Control." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 108, no. 6, 2008, pp. 1009-13.
Pittaway JK, Robertson IK, Ball MJ. Chickpeas may influence fatty acid and fiber intake in an ad libitum diet, leading to small improvements in serum lipid profile and glycemic control. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108(6):1009-13.
Pittaway, J. K., Robertson, I. K., & Ball, M. J. (2008). Chickpeas may influence fatty acid and fiber intake in an ad libitum diet, leading to small improvements in serum lipid profile and glycemic control. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 108(6), 1009-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2008.03.009
Pittaway JK, Robertson IK, Ball MJ. Chickpeas May Influence Fatty Acid and Fiber Intake in an Ad Libitum Diet, Leading to Small Improvements in Serum Lipid Profile and Glycemic Control. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108(6):1009-13. PubMed PMID: 18502235.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chickpeas may influence fatty acid and fiber intake in an ad libitum diet, leading to small improvements in serum lipid profile and glycemic control. AU - Pittaway,Jane K, AU - Robertson,Iain K, AU - Ball,Madeleine J, PY - 2007/04/02/received PY - 2007/08/28/accepted PY - 2008/5/27/pubmed PY - 2008/7/9/medline PY - 2008/5/27/entrez SP - 1009 EP - 13 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 108 IS - 6 N2 - Optimal replacement macronutrient/s for dietary saturated fat to reduce cardiovascular disease risk remains controversial. Chickpeas are rich in dietary fiber and polyunsaturated fatty acids. This exploratory study, conducted from September 2004 to May 2005, assessed the effect of incorporating chickpeas in the ad libitum diet of 45 free-living adults. Participants consumed a minimum of 728 g of canned, drained chickpeas per week (the amount in four 300-g cans) as part of their habitual diet for 12 weeks (chickpea phase), followed by 4 weeks of habitual diet without chickpeas (usual phase). In the chickpea phase, mean dietary fiber intake was 6.77 g/day more and mean polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption (as a percentage of total fat) was 2.66% more (both P<0.001), causing the polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio to change from 0.39 to 0.47 (P=0.045). Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were 7.7 mg/dL (0.20 mmol/L) and 7.3 mg/dL (0.19 mmol/L) less, respectively, after the chickpea phase (P<or=0.01), fasting insulin was 0.75 microIU/mL (5.21 pmol/L) less (P=0.045), and the homeostasis assessment model of insulin resistance was 0.21 less (P=0.01). Univariate analysis revealed that dietary fiber had the greatest single effect, reducing serum total cholesterol by 15.8 mg/dL (0.41 mmol/L) (P=0.01). Polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids had equivalent but opposing effects on serum total cholesterol and insulin. Larger studies on populations with greater degrees of hypercholesterolemia and/or hyperglycemia than the participants in this study are warranted. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18502235/Chickpeas_may_influence_fatty_acid_and_fiber_intake_in_an_ad_libitum_diet_leading_to_small_improvements_in_serum_lipid_profile_and_glycemic_control_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(08)00318-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -