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Moderate protein intake improves total and regional body composition and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults.
Metabolism. 2008 Jun; 57(6):757-65.M

Abstract

A high protein intake (approximately 40% of energy intake) combined with aerobic and resistance exercise training is more closely associated with improved body composition and cardiovascular risk profile than a traditional protein intake (approximately 15% of intake) combined with moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. However, there is concern that such high-protein diets may adversely affect health. We therefore tested the hypothesis that moderate protein intake (approximately 25% of energy intake) would elicit similar benefits on body composition and metabolic profile as high protein intake. Twenty-four overweight/obese men and women (body mass index [BMI] = 32.2 +/- 3.4, percentage of body fat [%BF] = 37.3 +/- 8.0) were matched for BMI and %BF and randomly assigned to one of 3 groups for a 3-month nutrition/exercise training intervention: (1) high-protein diet (approximately 40% of energy intake) and combined high-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training (HPEx, n = 8, 5 female and 3 male), (2) moderate-protein diet (approximately 25% of energy intake) and combined high-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training (MPEx, n = 8, 5 female and 3 male), or (3) high-protein diet only (HPNx, n = 8, 5 female and 3 male). Total and regional body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity (insulin sensitivity index to the oral glucose tolerance test), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and blood lipids were measured at baseline and after the intervention. All groups experienced significant (P < .05) and similar losses of body weight, BMI, and total and abdominal %BF, and similar improvements in insulin sensitivity (HPEx, 6.3 +/- 1.2 vs 9.5 +/- 0.98; MPEx, 6.2 +/- 1.4 vs 8.4 +/- 1.6; HPNx, 3.7 +/- 1.1 vs 7.0 +/- 1.1; insulin sensitivity index to the oral glucose tolerance test; P < .05) and leptin levels. Furthermore, the HPEx group demonstrated decreases in total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides, and increases in IGF-1 and IGFBP-1. The MPEx group experienced decreases in TC, whereas the HPNx group had increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, TC to high-density lipoprotein, IGF-1, and IGFBP-1. In conclusion, moderate protein intake elicits similar benefits in body composition and insulin sensitivity as a high-protein diet. These findings may have practical implications for individuals interested in diets containing elevated dietary protein.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Exercise Science, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA. parciero@skidmore.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18502257

Citation

Arciero, Paul J., et al. "Moderate Protein Intake Improves Total and Regional Body Composition and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight Adults." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 57, no. 6, 2008, pp. 757-65.
Arciero PJ, Gentile CL, Pressman R, et al. Moderate protein intake improves total and regional body composition and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults. Metabolism. 2008;57(6):757-65.
Arciero, P. J., Gentile, C. L., Pressman, R., Everett, M., Ormsbee, M. J., Martin, J., Santamore, J., Gorman, L., Fehling, P. C., Vukovich, M. D., & Nindl, B. C. (2008). Moderate protein intake improves total and regional body composition and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 57(6), 757-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2008.01.015
Arciero PJ, et al. Moderate Protein Intake Improves Total and Regional Body Composition and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight Adults. Metabolism. 2008;57(6):757-65. PubMed PMID: 18502257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Moderate protein intake improves total and regional body composition and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults. AU - Arciero,Paul J, AU - Gentile,Christopher L, AU - Pressman,Roger, AU - Everett,Meghan, AU - Ormsbee,Michael J, AU - Martin,Jeff, AU - Santamore,Jason, AU - Gorman,Liza, AU - Fehling,Patricia C, AU - Vukovich,Matthew D, AU - Nindl,Bradley C, PY - 2007/07/18/received PY - 2008/01/17/accepted PY - 2008/5/27/pubmed PY - 2008/7/9/medline PY - 2008/5/27/entrez SP - 757 EP - 65 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 57 IS - 6 N2 - A high protein intake (approximately 40% of energy intake) combined with aerobic and resistance exercise training is more closely associated with improved body composition and cardiovascular risk profile than a traditional protein intake (approximately 15% of intake) combined with moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. However, there is concern that such high-protein diets may adversely affect health. We therefore tested the hypothesis that moderate protein intake (approximately 25% of energy intake) would elicit similar benefits on body composition and metabolic profile as high protein intake. Twenty-four overweight/obese men and women (body mass index [BMI] = 32.2 +/- 3.4, percentage of body fat [%BF] = 37.3 +/- 8.0) were matched for BMI and %BF and randomly assigned to one of 3 groups for a 3-month nutrition/exercise training intervention: (1) high-protein diet (approximately 40% of energy intake) and combined high-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training (HPEx, n = 8, 5 female and 3 male), (2) moderate-protein diet (approximately 25% of energy intake) and combined high-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training (MPEx, n = 8, 5 female and 3 male), or (3) high-protein diet only (HPNx, n = 8, 5 female and 3 male). Total and regional body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity (insulin sensitivity index to the oral glucose tolerance test), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and blood lipids were measured at baseline and after the intervention. All groups experienced significant (P < .05) and similar losses of body weight, BMI, and total and abdominal %BF, and similar improvements in insulin sensitivity (HPEx, 6.3 +/- 1.2 vs 9.5 +/- 0.98; MPEx, 6.2 +/- 1.4 vs 8.4 +/- 1.6; HPNx, 3.7 +/- 1.1 vs 7.0 +/- 1.1; insulin sensitivity index to the oral glucose tolerance test; P < .05) and leptin levels. Furthermore, the HPEx group demonstrated decreases in total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides, and increases in IGF-1 and IGFBP-1. The MPEx group experienced decreases in TC, whereas the HPNx group had increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, TC to high-density lipoprotein, IGF-1, and IGFBP-1. In conclusion, moderate protein intake elicits similar benefits in body composition and insulin sensitivity as a high-protein diet. These findings may have practical implications for individuals interested in diets containing elevated dietary protein. SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18502257/Moderate_protein_intake_improves_total_and_regional_body_composition_and_insulin_sensitivity_in_overweight_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(08)00048-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -