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Mothers' attitudes towards using services preventing mother-to-child HIV/AIDS transmission in Zimbabwe: an interview survey.
Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Nov; 45(11):1618-24.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In developing countries vertical (mother-to-child) transmission of HIV/AIDS is responsible for 5-10% of all new HIV infections. HIV positive mothers can transmit HIV to their babies during pregnancy, childbirth and breast-feeding. Anti-retroviral drugs are effective in reducing the risk of vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS.

AIM

The main focus was to describe mothers' attitudes towards using services for preventing vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS.

DESIGN

A non-experimental, descriptive design with a survey approach was used.

SETTING

The study was conducted at one hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, that offers both prenatal clinic and maternity, including prevention of vertical transmission, services.

PARTICIPANTS

Fifty pregnant women, who attended prenatal clinics in Bulawayo and who booked to deliver their babies in the hospital's maternity section, were interviewed.

METHOD

A structured interview survey was used to collect data.

RESULTS

The interviewed women required more knowledge about preventing vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. Many pregnant women would not use the services available for the prevention of vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS, for personal, financial and cultural reasons. However, the most important barriers preventing pregnant women from using free prevention of vertical transmission services were structural ones. Only pregnant women who attended prenatal clinics and delivered their babies in hospital could access these services. Prenatal and delivery services might be beyond the financial reach of many Zimbabwean women, making prevention of vertical transmission services inaccessible to them. Free infant formula could not be accessed at hospitals and clinics because of transport costs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

United Bulawayo Hospitals, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18502426

Citation

Chivonivoni, Clara, et al. "Mothers' Attitudes Towards Using Services Preventing Mother-to-child HIV/AIDS Transmission in Zimbabwe: an Interview Survey." International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 45, no. 11, 2008, pp. 1618-24.
Chivonivoni C, Ehlers VJ, Roos JH. Mothers' attitudes towards using services preventing mother-to-child HIV/AIDS transmission in Zimbabwe: an interview survey. Int J Nurs Stud. 2008;45(11):1618-24.
Chivonivoni, C., Ehlers, V. J., & Roos, J. H. (2008). Mothers' attitudes towards using services preventing mother-to-child HIV/AIDS transmission in Zimbabwe: an interview survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 45(11), 1618-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2008.04.002
Chivonivoni C, Ehlers VJ, Roos JH. Mothers' Attitudes Towards Using Services Preventing Mother-to-child HIV/AIDS Transmission in Zimbabwe: an Interview Survey. Int J Nurs Stud. 2008;45(11):1618-24. PubMed PMID: 18502426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mothers' attitudes towards using services preventing mother-to-child HIV/AIDS transmission in Zimbabwe: an interview survey. AU - Chivonivoni,Clara, AU - Ehlers,Valerie J, AU - Roos,Janetta H, Y1 - 2008/05/27/ PY - 2007/06/28/received PY - 2008/03/31/revised PY - 2008/04/01/accepted PY - 2008/5/27/pubmed PY - 2009/1/31/medline PY - 2008/5/27/entrez SP - 1618 EP - 24 JF - International journal of nursing studies JO - Int J Nurs Stud VL - 45 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: In developing countries vertical (mother-to-child) transmission of HIV/AIDS is responsible for 5-10% of all new HIV infections. HIV positive mothers can transmit HIV to their babies during pregnancy, childbirth and breast-feeding. Anti-retroviral drugs are effective in reducing the risk of vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. AIM: The main focus was to describe mothers' attitudes towards using services for preventing vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. DESIGN: A non-experimental, descriptive design with a survey approach was used. SETTING: The study was conducted at one hospital in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, that offers both prenatal clinic and maternity, including prevention of vertical transmission, services. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty pregnant women, who attended prenatal clinics in Bulawayo and who booked to deliver their babies in the hospital's maternity section, were interviewed. METHOD: A structured interview survey was used to collect data. RESULTS: The interviewed women required more knowledge about preventing vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. Many pregnant women would not use the services available for the prevention of vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS, for personal, financial and cultural reasons. However, the most important barriers preventing pregnant women from using free prevention of vertical transmission services were structural ones. Only pregnant women who attended prenatal clinics and delivered their babies in hospital could access these services. Prenatal and delivery services might be beyond the financial reach of many Zimbabwean women, making prevention of vertical transmission services inaccessible to them. Free infant formula could not be accessed at hospitals and clinics because of transport costs. SN - 0020-7489 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18502426/Mothers'_attitudes_towards_using_services_preventing_mother_to_child_HIV/AIDS_transmission_in_Zimbabwe:_an_interview_survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0020-7489(08)00089-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -