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Effects of short and long duration hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on the plasma adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses to ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats.
Endocrinology. 1991 May; 128(5):2567-76.E

Abstract

We report here a study of the plasma ACTH and corticosterone responses to synthetic ovine CRH (oCRH) in hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats studied 7, 15, and 60 days after either thyroidectomy or the administration of pharmacological doses of T4. The purpose of this study was to further clarify the time-dependent effects of alterations in thyroid status on the functional integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and to aid in the interpretation of the oCRH stimulation test in hypo- and hyperthyroid states. Our data demonstrate that hypothyroid rats have a significant reduction in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of corticosterone and a significant decrease in adrenal weight in association with significant increases in the plasma ACTH response to oCRH. On the other hand, the corticosterone response to the ACTH released during the oCRH stimulation test was significantly reduced in hypothyroidism. With increasing duration of thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism, there was a progressive fall in CSF corticosterone levels, a progressive increase in the plasma ACTH response to oCRH, and a gradual normalization of the corticosterone responses to the ACTH released during oCRH stimulation. Our findings in hyperthyroid rats were generally the converse of those seen in hypothyroidism. Hence, there was a significant increase in the CSF levels of corticosterone and a significant increase in adrenal weight in association with an initial slight decrease in the ACTH response to oCRH. On the other hand, the corticosterone response to the ACTH released during oCRH stimulation was significantly increased. There was a gradual increase in the magnitude of the rise in CSF corticosterone levels with time, as well as a gradual normalization of adrenocortical responses during oCRH stimulation. The ACTH plasma clearance rates were similar in hypo-, hyper-, and euthyroid rats. Our data do not permit definitive identification of the precise locus in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is principally affected by experimentally induced alterations in thyroid status. However, these data are most compatible with a subtle hypothyroid-induced centrally mediated adrenal insufficiency and a subtle hyperthyroid-induced centrally mediated hypercortisolism. These data also suggest that alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in states of disturbed thyroid function become somewhat more pronounced as the duration of thyroid dysfunction increases. The fact that pituitary-adrenal responses to oCRH are consistently altered in states of thyroid dysfunction may be relevant to the clinical interpretation of oCRH stimulation tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1850357

Citation

Kamilaris, T C., et al. "Effects of Short and Long Duration Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism On the Plasma Adrenocorticotropin and Corticosterone Responses to Ovine Corticotropin-releasing Hormone in Rats." Endocrinology, vol. 128, no. 5, 1991, pp. 2567-76.
Kamilaris TC, DeBold CR, Johnson EO, et al. Effects of short and long duration hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on the plasma adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses to ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats. Endocrinology. 1991;128(5):2567-76.
Kamilaris, T. C., DeBold, C. R., Johnson, E. O., Mamalaki, E., Listwak, S. J., Calogero, A. E., Kalogeras, K. T., Gold, P. W., & Orth, D. N. (1991). Effects of short and long duration hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on the plasma adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses to ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats. Endocrinology, 128(5), 2567-76.
Kamilaris TC, et al. Effects of Short and Long Duration Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism On the Plasma Adrenocorticotropin and Corticosterone Responses to Ovine Corticotropin-releasing Hormone in Rats. Endocrinology. 1991;128(5):2567-76. PubMed PMID: 1850357.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of short and long duration hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on the plasma adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses to ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats. AU - Kamilaris,T C, AU - DeBold,C R, AU - Johnson,E O, AU - Mamalaki,E, AU - Listwak,S J, AU - Calogero,A E, AU - Kalogeras,K T, AU - Gold,P W, AU - Orth,D N, PY - 1991/5/1/pubmed PY - 1991/5/1/medline PY - 1991/5/1/entrez SP - 2567 EP - 76 JF - Endocrinology JO - Endocrinology VL - 128 IS - 5 N2 - We report here a study of the plasma ACTH and corticosterone responses to synthetic ovine CRH (oCRH) in hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats studied 7, 15, and 60 days after either thyroidectomy or the administration of pharmacological doses of T4. The purpose of this study was to further clarify the time-dependent effects of alterations in thyroid status on the functional integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and to aid in the interpretation of the oCRH stimulation test in hypo- and hyperthyroid states. Our data demonstrate that hypothyroid rats have a significant reduction in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of corticosterone and a significant decrease in adrenal weight in association with significant increases in the plasma ACTH response to oCRH. On the other hand, the corticosterone response to the ACTH released during the oCRH stimulation test was significantly reduced in hypothyroidism. With increasing duration of thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism, there was a progressive fall in CSF corticosterone levels, a progressive increase in the plasma ACTH response to oCRH, and a gradual normalization of the corticosterone responses to the ACTH released during oCRH stimulation. Our findings in hyperthyroid rats were generally the converse of those seen in hypothyroidism. Hence, there was a significant increase in the CSF levels of corticosterone and a significant increase in adrenal weight in association with an initial slight decrease in the ACTH response to oCRH. On the other hand, the corticosterone response to the ACTH released during oCRH stimulation was significantly increased. There was a gradual increase in the magnitude of the rise in CSF corticosterone levels with time, as well as a gradual normalization of adrenocortical responses during oCRH stimulation. The ACTH plasma clearance rates were similar in hypo-, hyper-, and euthyroid rats. Our data do not permit definitive identification of the precise locus in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is principally affected by experimentally induced alterations in thyroid status. However, these data are most compatible with a subtle hypothyroid-induced centrally mediated adrenal insufficiency and a subtle hyperthyroid-induced centrally mediated hypercortisolism. These data also suggest that alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in states of disturbed thyroid function become somewhat more pronounced as the duration of thyroid dysfunction increases. The fact that pituitary-adrenal responses to oCRH are consistently altered in states of thyroid dysfunction may be relevant to the clinical interpretation of oCRH stimulation tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) SN - 0013-7227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1850357/Effects_of_short_and_long_duration_hypothyroidism_and_hyperthyroidism_on_the_plasma_adrenocorticotropin_and_corticosterone_responses_to_ovine_corticotropin_releasing_hormone_in_rats_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/endo/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/endo-128-5-2567 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -