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Racial disparities in trends for cardiovascular disease and procedures among hospitalized diabetic patients.
Ethn Dis. 2008 Spring; 18(2):131-5.ED

Abstract

METHODS

To determine if racial differences exist for trends in diabetes-related cardiovascular disease (CVD) hospitalization rates, we analyzed data from an inpatient hospital discharge database maintained by the South Carolina Office of Research and Statistics. All hospitalizations involving a diagnosis of diabetes were collected from 1996 through 2003. International Classification of Diseases codes were used to determine diagnosis for diabetes, acute myocardial infraction (AMI), stroke, and other CVD outcomes. Multiple linear regression was performed to model the age-standardized rates during the study period. An interaction parameter for race and discharge year was used in the models to determine if the trend slopes varied between African Americans and Caucasians.

RESULTS

The diabetes-related hospitalization rates for AMI and stroke declined for both race groups. Although the stroke rates for African Americans were consistently higher than those for Caucasians, the African American trend declined more sharply (P=.027). AMI rates showed sharper declines among Caucasians (P<.001). Rates of CVD procedures (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft) were two to three times greater among Caucasians. Cardiomyopathy rates were significantly greater among African Americans and showed a larger increasing trend (P<.001), and findings for congestive heart failure trends were similar (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Diabetes-related CVD rates and trends vary considerably by race. Rates of AMI and stroke declined in African Americans and Caucasians from 1996 through 2003, while other CVD rates increased. Further research is needed to understand the underlying components of these disparities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. mountfo@musc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18507262

Citation

Mountford, William K., et al. "Racial Disparities in Trends for Cardiovascular Disease and Procedures Among Hospitalized Diabetic Patients." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 18, no. 2, 2008, pp. 131-5.
Mountford WK, Lackland DT, Soule JB, et al. Racial disparities in trends for cardiovascular disease and procedures among hospitalized diabetic patients. Ethn Dis. 2008;18(2):131-5.
Mountford, W. K., Lackland, D. T., Soule, J. B., Hunt, K. J., Lipsitz, S. R., & Colwell, J. A. (2008). Racial disparities in trends for cardiovascular disease and procedures among hospitalized diabetic patients. Ethnicity & Disease, 18(2), 131-5.
Mountford WK, et al. Racial Disparities in Trends for Cardiovascular Disease and Procedures Among Hospitalized Diabetic Patients. Ethn Dis. 2008;18(2):131-5. PubMed PMID: 18507262.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial disparities in trends for cardiovascular disease and procedures among hospitalized diabetic patients. AU - Mountford,William K, AU - Lackland,Daniel T, AU - Soule,Jeremy B, AU - Hunt,Kelly J, AU - Lipsitz,Stuart R, AU - Colwell,John A, PY - 2008/5/30/pubmed PY - 2008/7/25/medline PY - 2008/5/30/entrez SP - 131 EP - 5 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 18 IS - 2 N2 - METHODS: To determine if racial differences exist for trends in diabetes-related cardiovascular disease (CVD) hospitalization rates, we analyzed data from an inpatient hospital discharge database maintained by the South Carolina Office of Research and Statistics. All hospitalizations involving a diagnosis of diabetes were collected from 1996 through 2003. International Classification of Diseases codes were used to determine diagnosis for diabetes, acute myocardial infraction (AMI), stroke, and other CVD outcomes. Multiple linear regression was performed to model the age-standardized rates during the study period. An interaction parameter for race and discharge year was used in the models to determine if the trend slopes varied between African Americans and Caucasians. RESULTS: The diabetes-related hospitalization rates for AMI and stroke declined for both race groups. Although the stroke rates for African Americans were consistently higher than those for Caucasians, the African American trend declined more sharply (P=.027). AMI rates showed sharper declines among Caucasians (P<.001). Rates of CVD procedures (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft) were two to three times greater among Caucasians. Cardiomyopathy rates were significantly greater among African Americans and showed a larger increasing trend (P<.001), and findings for congestive heart failure trends were similar (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes-related CVD rates and trends vary considerably by race. Rates of AMI and stroke declined in African Americans and Caucasians from 1996 through 2003, while other CVD rates increased. Further research is needed to understand the underlying components of these disparities. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18507262/Racial_disparities_in_trends_for_cardiovascular_disease_and_procedures_among_hospitalized_diabetic_patients_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/diabetescomplications.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -