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Jasmonic acid treatment to part of the root system is consistent with simulated leaf herbivory, diverting recently assimilated carbon towards untreated roots within an hour.
Plant Cell Environ. 2008 Sep; 31(9):1229-36.PC

Abstract

It is known that shoot application of jasmonic acid (JA) leads to an increased carbon export from leaves to stem and roots, and that root treatment with JA inhibits root growth. Using the radioisotope (11)C, we measured JA effects on carbon partitioning in sterile, split-root, barley plants. JA applied to one root half reduced carbon partitioning to the JA-treated tissue within minutes, whereas the untreated side showed a corresponding--but slower--increase. This response was not observed when instead of applying JA, the sink strength of one root half was reduced by cooling it: there was no enhanced partitioning to the untreated roots. The slower response in the JA-untreated roots, and the difference between the effect of JA and temperature, suggest that root JA treatment caused transduction of a signal from the treated roots to the shoot, leading to an increase in carbon allocation from the leaves to the untreated root tissue, as was indeed observed 10 min after the shoot application of JA. This supports the hypothesis that the response of some plant species to both leaf and root herbivores may be the diversion of resources to safer locations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ICG-3 Phytosphere, Forschungszentrum Jülich Jülich, Germany. gunnarhenkes@gmx.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18507808

Citation

Henkes, Gunnar Jakob, et al. "Jasmonic Acid Treatment to Part of the Root System Is Consistent With Simulated Leaf Herbivory, Diverting Recently Assimilated Carbon Towards Untreated Roots Within an Hour." Plant, Cell & Environment, vol. 31, no. 9, 2008, pp. 1229-36.
Henkes GJ, Thorpe MR, Minchin PE, et al. Jasmonic acid treatment to part of the root system is consistent with simulated leaf herbivory, diverting recently assimilated carbon towards untreated roots within an hour. Plant Cell Environ. 2008;31(9):1229-36.
Henkes, G. J., Thorpe, M. R., Minchin, P. E., Schurr, U., & Röse, U. S. (2008). Jasmonic acid treatment to part of the root system is consistent with simulated leaf herbivory, diverting recently assimilated carbon towards untreated roots within an hour. Plant, Cell & Environment, 31(9), 1229-36. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2008.01828.x
Henkes GJ, et al. Jasmonic Acid Treatment to Part of the Root System Is Consistent With Simulated Leaf Herbivory, Diverting Recently Assimilated Carbon Towards Untreated Roots Within an Hour. Plant Cell Environ. 2008;31(9):1229-36. PubMed PMID: 18507808.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Jasmonic acid treatment to part of the root system is consistent with simulated leaf herbivory, diverting recently assimilated carbon towards untreated roots within an hour. AU - Henkes,Gunnar Jakob, AU - Thorpe,Michael R, AU - Minchin,Peter E H, AU - Schurr,Ulrich, AU - Röse,Ursula S R, Y1 - 2008/05/23/ PY - 2008/5/30/pubmed PY - 2008/11/6/medline PY - 2008/5/30/entrez SP - 1229 EP - 36 JF - Plant, cell & environment JO - Plant Cell Environ VL - 31 IS - 9 N2 - It is known that shoot application of jasmonic acid (JA) leads to an increased carbon export from leaves to stem and roots, and that root treatment with JA inhibits root growth. Using the radioisotope (11)C, we measured JA effects on carbon partitioning in sterile, split-root, barley plants. JA applied to one root half reduced carbon partitioning to the JA-treated tissue within minutes, whereas the untreated side showed a corresponding--but slower--increase. This response was not observed when instead of applying JA, the sink strength of one root half was reduced by cooling it: there was no enhanced partitioning to the untreated roots. The slower response in the JA-untreated roots, and the difference between the effect of JA and temperature, suggest that root JA treatment caused transduction of a signal from the treated roots to the shoot, leading to an increase in carbon allocation from the leaves to the untreated root tissue, as was indeed observed 10 min after the shoot application of JA. This supports the hypothesis that the response of some plant species to both leaf and root herbivores may be the diversion of resources to safer locations. SN - 1365-3040 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18507808/Jasmonic_acid_treatment_to_part_of_the_root_system_is_consistent_with_simulated_leaf_herbivory_diverting_recently_assimilated_carbon_towards_untreated_roots_within_an_hour_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2008.01828.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -