Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cognitive dietary restraint: impact on bone, menstrual and metabolic status in young women.
Physiol Behav. 2008 Sep 03; 95(1-2):48-55.PB

Abstract

We compared bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), menstrual and metabolic status between physically active women with 1) high cognitive dietary restraint (High-CDR) (score > or = 9, n=38) and Normal-CDR (score<9, n=46) and 2) across quartiles of CDR scores. Eighty-four physically active (500+/-35 min wk(-1)) premenopausal women participated and were categorized according to their CDR score. Primary outcomes included, BMD, BMC, menstrual status, estrone-3-glucuronide (E1G) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG) area under the curve (AUC). Secondary outcomes included resting energy expenditure (REE), total triiodothyronine, and ghrelin. Measures of body mass (59.2+/-1.1 vs. 58.5+/-1.0 kg) and percent body fat (24.7+/-1.2 vs. 23.7+/-0.7%) were similar between women with Normal-CDR and High-CDR, however the High-CDR group had lower total body (1.140+/-0.011 vs. 1.179+/-0.010 g cm(-2); p=0.015) and lumbar spine (1.114+/-0.019 vs. 1.223+/-0.022 g cm(-2); p=0.001) BMD. The prevalence of oligo-amenorrhea was higher in the High-CDR group and became increasingly greater across the CDR quartiles. There were no differences in metabolic characteristics between the High-CDR and Normal-CDR groups, however REE and the ratio of measured to predicted REE were lower in the fourth quartile (CDR scores > or = 13) compared to the second and third quartiles. Our results provide evidence that high CDR scores are associated with reduced lumbar spine and total body BMD in physically active premenopausal women. A greater frequency of menstrual disturbances in women with higher CDR scores likely played a role in the reduced total body and lumbar spine BMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Women's Exercise and Bone Health Laboratory, Graduate Department of Exercise Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 2WS.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18508099

Citation

Vescovi, Jason D., et al. "Cognitive Dietary Restraint: Impact On Bone, Menstrual and Metabolic Status in Young Women." Physiology & Behavior, vol. 95, no. 1-2, 2008, pp. 48-55.
Vescovi JD, Scheid JL, Hontscharuk R, et al. Cognitive dietary restraint: impact on bone, menstrual and metabolic status in young women. Physiol Behav. 2008;95(1-2):48-55.
Vescovi, J. D., Scheid, J. L., Hontscharuk, R., & De Souza, M. J. (2008). Cognitive dietary restraint: impact on bone, menstrual and metabolic status in young women. Physiology & Behavior, 95(1-2), 48-55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2008.04.003
Vescovi JD, et al. Cognitive Dietary Restraint: Impact On Bone, Menstrual and Metabolic Status in Young Women. Physiol Behav. 2008 Sep 3;95(1-2):48-55. PubMed PMID: 18508099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive dietary restraint: impact on bone, menstrual and metabolic status in young women. AU - Vescovi,Jason D, AU - Scheid,Jennifer L, AU - Hontscharuk,Rayisa, AU - De Souza,Mary Jane, Y1 - 2008/04/11/ PY - 2007/09/15/received PY - 2008/02/27/revised PY - 2008/04/03/accepted PY - 2008/5/30/pubmed PY - 2008/12/19/medline PY - 2008/5/30/entrez SP - 48 EP - 55 JF - Physiology & behavior JO - Physiol Behav VL - 95 IS - 1-2 N2 - We compared bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), menstrual and metabolic status between physically active women with 1) high cognitive dietary restraint (High-CDR) (score > or = 9, n=38) and Normal-CDR (score<9, n=46) and 2) across quartiles of CDR scores. Eighty-four physically active (500+/-35 min wk(-1)) premenopausal women participated and were categorized according to their CDR score. Primary outcomes included, BMD, BMC, menstrual status, estrone-3-glucuronide (E1G) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG) area under the curve (AUC). Secondary outcomes included resting energy expenditure (REE), total triiodothyronine, and ghrelin. Measures of body mass (59.2+/-1.1 vs. 58.5+/-1.0 kg) and percent body fat (24.7+/-1.2 vs. 23.7+/-0.7%) were similar between women with Normal-CDR and High-CDR, however the High-CDR group had lower total body (1.140+/-0.011 vs. 1.179+/-0.010 g cm(-2); p=0.015) and lumbar spine (1.114+/-0.019 vs. 1.223+/-0.022 g cm(-2); p=0.001) BMD. The prevalence of oligo-amenorrhea was higher in the High-CDR group and became increasingly greater across the CDR quartiles. There were no differences in metabolic characteristics between the High-CDR and Normal-CDR groups, however REE and the ratio of measured to predicted REE were lower in the fourth quartile (CDR scores > or = 13) compared to the second and third quartiles. Our results provide evidence that high CDR scores are associated with reduced lumbar spine and total body BMD in physically active premenopausal women. A greater frequency of menstrual disturbances in women with higher CDR scores likely played a role in the reduced total body and lumbar spine BMD. SN - 0031-9384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18508099/Cognitive_dietary_restraint:_impact_on_bone_menstrual_and_metabolic_status_in_young_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0031-9384(08)00100-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -